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30,000 empty seats in junior colleges in Pune a threat to jobs of teaching staff

Although the situation was similar to 2017 when 21,000 seats were vacant out of 92,530 seats, the increase of almost 5,000 seats in self-financed colleges this year is being said to have caused the spike in the numbers

pune Updated: Nov 10, 2018 15:05 IST
Ananya Barua
Ananya Barua
Hindustan Times, Pune
Pune,junior colleges,teaching staff
As per the data shared by the education department, out of a total of 97,435 seats that were made available for admission under the centralised admission process (CAP) this year, 30,743 remained vacant.(Hindustan Times)

The Maharashtra state federation of junior college teachers’ organisation (MSFJCTO), has expressed concern over the 30,000-plus seats going vacant in junior colleges in Pune and the consequent threat to the jobs of the teaching staff of junior colleges.

As per the data shared by the education department, out of a total of 97,435 seats that were made available for admission under the centralised admission process (CAP) this year, 30,743 remained vacant.

Although the situation was similar to 2017 when 21,000 seats were vacant out of 92,530 seats, the increase of almost 5,000 seats in self-financed colleges this year is being said to have caused the spike in the numbers.

Federation president Anil Deshmukh said those that are most hit because of this situation, are the junior college teachers in aided institutes, as they run at a risk of either shutting down of the batches or losing their jobs. “The department makes sure that if a low percentage of students enrol, the said course is shut for further admissions both online and offline. But, that is not the case for self-financed institutes, where the management has the liberty to decide whether to shut down the courses or not,” he said.

Deshmukh said many parents and students today want to dedicate more of their time in coaching classes and many unaided institutes give them the flexibility and liberty to maintain their admission without proper attendance.

Unfortunately, despite the government’s attempts to remedy this by introducing biometric, the situation is unchecked as the institutes flexibly allow students to mark attendance at the coaching centers instead,” said Anwar Shaikh, principal of Anjuman E Khairul Islam ‘s Poona college of arts, commerce and science.

According to Deshmukh, this has further pushed students away from aided institutes, which do not adhere to such flexibility. “At the end of the day, the menace of these coaching centers bring the overall attendance of batches in aided institutes, pushing them to a shutdown,” he said.

Meenakshi Raut, in-charge deputy director of education, Pune, said the education department was helpless as the existing policy allows institutes to start the self-financed divisions thus increasing the pool of seats. The increase in vacancies has been observed mostly in the semi-urban and rural areas, as most students prefer to study in the cities, she said.

First Published: Nov 10, 2018 15:04 IST