Are students safe in Ludhiana schools? Security upped, entry cards for parents at Ryan School, Jamalpur | punjab | ludhiana | Hindustan Times
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Are students safe in Ludhiana schools? Security upped, entry cards for parents at Ryan School, Jamalpur

Stringent measures: Even as CBSE has issued guidelines for schools regarding students’ safety on the campus, private schools take initiative by stepping up surveillance to ensure 100% compliance

punjab Updated: Sep 15, 2017 12:57 IST
Deepa Sharma Sood
Deepa Sharma Sood
Hindustan Times, Ludhiana
A visit to Ryan International School, Jamalpur, shows that the school has adopted stringent measures to ensure the safety of students on the campus, from deputing teachers and guards at the school gate to making entry cards compulsory for parents.
A visit to Ryan International School, Jamalpur, shows that the school has adopted stringent measures to ensure the safety of students on the campus, from deputing teachers and guards at the school gate to making entry cards compulsory for parents.(GURMINDER SINGH/HT)

In the wake of the seven-year-old boy’s murder in Gurgaon’s Ryan International School, private schools in the city are leaving no stone unturned to ensure the security of students on campus. Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) issued strict guidelines regarding the same and has warned schools of disaffiliation in case of non-compliance.

“An entry card was earlier compulsory for parents with wards studying up to Class 2. But after this incident, we have decided to introduce the same system for all.”

A visit to Ryan International School, Jamalpur, shows that the school has adopted stringent measures to ensure the safety of students on the campus.

From deputing teachers at school gates along with security guards to making entry cards compulsory for parents who come to pick up their wards, the school authorities have prioritised students’ safety so that a similar incident is not repeated here.

Teachers and security guards have been deputed at entrance and exit gates from where parents come to pick up their wards. As a precaution, the school also sent a message to all parents on Wednesday to fill out details for an entry card by September 15.

Principal Gurpal Kaur Anand said, “An entry card was earlier compulsory for parents with wards studying up to Class 2. But after this incident, we have decided to introduce the same system for all.”

She added that the school provided for separate toilets for boys and girls on every floor and maids were deputed outside each. School buses were parked inside and bus conductors and drivers use separate toilets.

Few female attendants

The school has 44 buses, but is facing a shortage of female attendants. According to guidelines, CBSE has mandated affiliated schools to depute female attendants in all school buses in view of students’ safety during the journey from home to school and back.

The parents’ association of Ryan International School also wrote to the principal regarding security arrangements for students. Parents have asked for CCTV cameras on the campus and school buses.

General secretary Inderjit Singh said, “We wrote to the school to ensure that all non-teaching staff got police clearance. We also want female attendants to be deployed outside the junior wing washrooms; no other student should be allowed to use them.”

Other private schools follow suit

Other prominent private schools in the city too are putting their best foot forward to ensure the safety of its students.

From organising workshops to making strict rules for visitors, a number of schools have also started counselling its students on the difference between good touch and bad touch.

Navita Puri, principal, Kundan Vidya Mandir School, Civil Lines, said, “We will conduct workshops to make the students aware of the difference between good touch and bad touch.”

“We will also encourage students to report all such matters so that appropriate action can be taken,” she added.

Many schools are putting all their focus on surveillance by monitoring the movement of visitors inside the campus. Bhupinder Gogia, principal, Sat Paul Mittal School, Dugri, said, “We are already following the guidelines of the police commissioner, but there is always a room for improvement and we are working on it. We are strictly monitoring visitors who have access to the school building. We have CCTV cameras installed at designated ‘vulnerable’ spots, but will ask police to review the school’s security in case we missed anything.”

Awareness on sexual abuse among students has also become a priority now. Rajesh Rudra, director, Green Land group of schools, said, “We will counsel students about good touch and bad touch. If they face any problem, they can directly inform the principal. We are also planning to replace male security guards with female.”