Nobel laureate Sir CV Raman the Nobel laureate physicist.(Photo courtesy: Google)
Nobel laureate Sir CV Raman the Nobel laureate physicist.(Photo courtesy: Google)

On National Science Day, here’s all about Raman Effect or Raman Scattering

The discovery was significant in the field of physics as it gave proof of the quantum nature of light. It revolutionised multiple different domains of science and still forms the basis of varied applications in these fields.
By hindustantimes.com | Edited by Shivani, Hindustan Times, New Delhi
PUBLISHED ON FEB 28, 2021 04:34 PM IST

Every year India observes National Science Day on February 28 to commemorate the discovery of the ‘Raman Effect’ by physicist Sir Chandrasekhara Venkata Raman. It was on this day that the announcement regarding the discovery was made and which led to winning the Nobel Prize in physics. The Indian government also honoured Raman with the Bharat Ratna, the country’s highest civilian award.

Various programs are organised across the country to mark the National Science Day celebrations and motivate the students to opt for science as their career. Department of Science and Technology (DST also started the National Awards for Science Popularisation in February 1987 to recognise contribution in science through awards. The awards are given out on National Science Day under six categories.

This year, the government has decided "Future of STI: Impacts on Education, Skills, and Work" as the theme of this year's celebration.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi also spoke about the scientist in his monthly radio programme Mann Ki Baat and advised the youth of the country to read more about Indian scientists. "Today is National Science Day. It is dedicated to the discovery of the 'Raman Effect' by scientist Dr CV Raman. Our youth should read a lot about Indian scientists and understand the history of Indian science."

What is the 'Raman Effect’?

Raman Effect, also known as Raman Scattering, is the change in the wavelength of light that occurs when it is deflected by molecules. A light beam traversing through a transparent sample of a chemical compound sees a small fraction of the light emerging in a different direction to that of the incoming beam. A small part of that light has a differing wavelength from the incident light. This is because of the phenomenon known as Raman Effect.

The discovery was significant in the field of physics as it gave proof of the quantum nature of light. It revolutionised multiple different domains of science and still forms the basis of varied applications in these fields.

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