Indian cinema is famous for its colours, grandeur: Deepika Padukone | bollywood | Hindustan Times
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Indian cinema is famous for its colours, grandeur: Deepika Padukone

Deepika Padukone believes that the song and dance sequences are still popular with the international audience.

bollywood Updated: May 20, 2017 14:20 IST
Deepika Padukone poses as she arrives on May 18, 2017 for the screening of the film Loveless (Nelyubov) at the 70th edition of the Cannes Film Festival in Cannes, southern France.
Deepika Padukone poses as she arrives on May 18, 2017 for the screening of the film Loveless (Nelyubov) at the 70th edition of the Cannes Film Festival in Cannes, southern France.(AFP)

Deepika Padukone, who made her red carpet debut at the Cannes Film Festival this year, says though the audience at the carnival is exposed to all kinds of films, Indian cinema is mostly popular for its “colours and song and dance” sequences. “The people at Cannes are aware about our film industry... When you walk the red carpet, they know the country you are from, the film industry you belong to. The audience is exposed to different kinds of Indian films, be it Devdas or Gangs of Wasseypur,” Deepika told reporters during a Face Time interview from Cannes.

The 31-year-old actor, however, believes that the song and dance sequences are still popular with the international audience. “Susan Sarandon was talking about her son making a film and how he picked up on the dance element we have in Indian films and incorporated it in his film. We do have that much dance and song in our films, so the perception is that. I know all our films are not just about song and dance, we do a lot more... But largely the perception (about Indian cinema) is colour, scale, grandeur, song and dance and a lot of culture.”

Deepika walked the red carpet at Cannes as L’Oreal Paris brand ambassador on May 17 and 18. While three Bollywood actors are walking the red carpet this year, Indian films did not make the cut at Cannes except for a short film.

Deepika is not disheartened as she believes it will change next year. “It would have been nice if we had some Indian films. I am sure it will happen, sometimes it happens and sometimes it doesn’t. We can’t be hard on ourselves. It will happen when it has to.”

Deepika says if she had her way, she would have loved to show Shoojit Sircar’s Piku at Cannes. “A film that I would have brought here would be Piku. I am very proud of Piku and I would have loved to show it here,” she says.