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Home / Art and Culture / Get creative during the COVID-19 lockdown

Get creative during the COVID-19 lockdown

It is not just you and me, but even Bollywood celebrities like Janhvi Kapoor, who are taking to art to explore her creativity while she has to stay at home due to the lockdown.

art-and-culture Updated: Mar 31, 2020 15:59 IST
Nascimento Pinto
Nascimento Pinto
Art brings out the creativity in people, which is extremely important in times like these as in our daily fixed routines, we don’t get time to express ourselves freely.
Art brings out the creativity in people, which is extremely important in times like these as in our daily fixed routines, we don’t get time to express ourselves freely.(Unsplash)

It is not just you and me, but even Bollywood celebrities like Janhvi Kapoor, who are taking to art to explore her creativity while she has to stay at home due to the lockdown. Sketching and painting does a lot more than pass your time, and as many are considering doing it now more than ever at home, it is needless to say that the benefits are plenty. “Art brings out the creativity in people, which is extremely important in times like these as in our daily fixed routines, we don’t get time to express ourselves freely,” says Dr Hansaji Jayadeva Yogendra, director, The Yoga Institute.

Psychotherapist Dr Ajay Tamhane uses art, colour and music therapy as a part of his workshops, and he says this period is for people to slow down. “Art is actually a four-letter word called love, which simply means that people should use this time to do anything they love as long as it makes people happy,” he says.

However, there is more to art than just being known to be fun and relaxing, Dr Gauri Karkhanis, clinical psychologist, Nanavati Super Speciality Hospital, says, “It can give you a healthy outlet for expressing and letting go of all feelings and fears, especially for children, which helps parents understand them better.” While many are busy scurrying about with their art supplies, other ways that can be used are scribbling, doodling, finger painting, and even craft.

Dr Tamhane adds, “It doesn’t have to be any particular kind of paints, people can simply use charcoal or even chalk.” The rise in the number of people using colouring books, not just among children but also for adults is encouraging and makes us curious about their effect during such times in isolation. “I love colouring books. Colouring helps you to become focused. It is very captivating and de-stressing,” says Dr Yogendra. Dr Kharkhanis, who agrees, says psychologists also use it as one of the modalities in treating various mental health issues.“They can give one a feeling of self-accomplishment and improve one’s self-confidence, and helps fight boredom,” she says.

As colours form an integral part of colouring and sketching, the role of specific colours may have quite an effect, but Dr Yogendra remains unbiased. “Every colour has its own effect and different personalities choose different colours. We can’t really distinguish between them and instead, it is important to enjoy their combination,” she adds. Dr Kharkhanis says while there shouldn’t be restrictions in expressing oneself, people should use colours that make them feel happy. “Maybe try and avoid dull colours and surround oneself with plenty of light,” she advises. While the colours may differ from person to person, Dr Tamhane says there are certain colours, which could make a difference for people. “Being surrounded by colours like Red, Yellow, Blue, and Green helps, and while they may be used now, we will see the tremendous changes of this period, alter our lifestyle, in the next few months,” he concludes.

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