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Home / Pune News / Pune’s second wettest October in a decade

Pune’s second wettest October in a decade

The city witnessed 235.5mm rainfall in October this year, while the highest was recorded in October 2010 at 262.8 mm

pune Updated: Nov 01, 2019, 16:12 IST
Prachi Bari
Prachi Bari
Hindustan Times, Pune
The October post-monsoon rains this year in Pune is the second-highest in a decade, according to data by the India Meteorological Department (IMD).
The October post-monsoon rains this year in Pune is the second-highest in a decade, according to data by the India Meteorological Department (IMD).(Milind Saurkar/HT Photo)

The October post-monsoon rains this year in Pune is the second-highest in a decade, according to data by the India Meteorological Department (IMD). The city witnessed 235.5mm rainfall in October this year, while the highest was recorded in October 2010 at 262.8 mm.

Anupam Kashyapi, head of weather, IMD, said, “There is uniformity in the distribution of rain during October this year as compared to rainfall in October 2010. In 2010, in one day alone on October 5, 181.3mm rainfall was recorded.”

The third highest rainfall was recorded in October 2011 at 200.4mm.

Kashyapi said, “The city witnessed heavy spell post-monsoon due to the still active super cyclonic storm, though weak in the Arabian Sea. The depression over Maldives-Comorin and adjoining Lakshadweep moved north-westwards and intensified into a deep depression over Lakshadweep and adjoining south-east Arabian Sea and the Maldives.”

“It further moved north-westwards and intensified into a cyclonic storm Maha. It has moved north-northwestwards and lay centred at 0530 hours on the October 31, 2019, near latitude 11.0°N and longitude 73.0°E over Lakshadweep and adjoining southeast Arabian Sea, about 30 km east-southeast of Amini Divi (Lakshadweep), 300 km north of Minicoy (Lakshadweep), 60 km north-northeast of Kavaratti (Lakshadweep) and 300 km west-southwest of Kozhikode (Kerala),” added Kashyapi.

“The very severe cyclonic storm ‘Kyaar’ over west-central and adjoining the northwest Arabian Sea, moved south-westwards and weakened into a severe cyclonic storm. It is very likely to move south-westwards across the west-central Arabian Sea during the next three days. It is very likely to weaken into a deep depression during the next 18 hours and further into a depression during the subsequent six hours,” he further added. 

Kashyapi also said, “ There are four distinct reasons for the October rainfall, withdrawal of monsoon was on October 15, but due to global warming, we are seeing frequent cyclones forming in extreme events, then there is the interaction of southerly and easterly winds, besides the pressure from Kyarr cyclone followed by super cyclone Maha.” 

According to IMD, the city will see thunder activity with lightning, light rain very likely from November 1 to 5. On November 6 the city will witness partly cloudy sky with very likely light to light rain.

October rainfall

2009 – 104.7 mm

2010 –262.8 mm (highest)

2011—200.4 mm (third )

2012—144.5 mm

2013 – 34.7 mm

2014— 25.9 mm

2015— 76.7 mm

2016—80.4 mm

2017 – 180.9 mm

2018 – 36.1 mm

2019 – 235.5 mm (second)

Reasons for post-monsoon rains in October 2019: Formation of cyclonic storms Maha, Kyaar due to global warming

ht epaper

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