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Thursday, Nov 21, 2019

India vs South Africa: Rohit Sharma’s cheeky response to reporters leaves everyone in splits - Watch

Opening in Tests presents a different challenge from what he is used to in white-ball cricket. “And a different challenge to batting at No.5 or No.7 at times.

cricket Updated: Oct 21, 2019 10:44 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times, New Delhi
India's Rohit Sharma
India's Rohit Sharma (AP)
         

Rohit Sharma dominated Day 2 on the ongoing Ranchi Test and notched up his maiden double hundred in the longest format. Along with Ajinkya Rahane, he powered India to 497/9 when Virat Kohli declared the innings. In the post day press-conference Rohit spoke about his innings and said that he wanted to make a significant contribution at the top of the order. He also took a cheeky dig at reporters when he said that hoped the media writes good things about him.

India vs South Africa, 3rd Test, Day 3: Live score and updates

“Wanted to use the opportunity to full. Otherwise, a lot would have been said and written (about my Test career). You folks write a lot about me. Now you will write some good things I hope,” said Rohit.

 

This is his 30th Test in a career that began in November 2013, so Sharma said, “in terms of what was thrown at me in this Test, I would definitely say it was probably the most challenging one (Test innings).” Sharma was referring to surviving a stiff test from Kagiso Rabada in the first session on Saturday when India were 39/3.

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Opening in Tests presents a different challenge from what he is used to in white-ball cricket. “And a different challenge to batting at No.5 or No.7 at times. “Playing the first ball, compared to facing the ball after 30-40 overs where you need to play with a low backlift because the ball is older, softer and can keep low in India.

“There’s nothing in particular that I’ve done in terms of technique. (But) The new ball does something in whatever conditions you play... We saw in Ranchi and Pune that it did something (more) than (it) would overseas, in Australia for instance. I was allowing myself to take time rather than going after the ball,” he said.