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Home / Delhi News / Delhi Metro to bring in software that will now track usage for every line

Delhi Metro to bring in software that will now track usage for every line

With the new system, which is also used in Tokyo and London, a commuter’s presence will be recorded on each line she uses to reach her destination.

delhi Updated: May 02, 2018 23:51 IST
Soumya Pillai
Soumya Pillai
Hindustan Times, New Delhi
The new system will work on the “reverse journey planner” mode, where the traffic will be assessed based on the route and the time taken for the travel.
The new system will work on the “reverse journey planner” mode, where the traffic will be assessed based on the route and the time taken for the travel.(HT File Photo)

The Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) is putting in place a new software that will record the actual utilisation of individual lines in the Metro network to help the agency better understand how the system is being used and enable it to cater to the needs of the passengers, a top DMRC official said on Wednesday.

The managing director of DMRC, Mangu Singh, said in an interview that commuter traffic was so far calculated based on the entry and exit made by a passenger at the Automatic Fare Collection (AFC) gate, but the new software would assess traffic on each line separately, giving a clearer picture of how the system was being utilised.

“We have started calculating line utilisation on all our lines, which will give a more accurate figure of how well our network is being used,” Singh said.

For example, if a commuter was travelling from Dwarka Sector-10 on the Blue Line to Shastri Park on the Red Line, she is recorded as a single rider.

Though the commuter uses three lines (Blue — Dwarka sector-10 to Rajiv Chowk, Yellow — Rajiv Chowk to Kashmere Gate, and Red — Kashmere Gate to Shastri Park) to reach her final destination, her presence is not recorded in all the three lines.

With the new system, which is also used in Tokyo and London, a commuter’s presence will be recorded on each line she uses to reach her destination.

The system will work on the “reverse journey planner” mode, where the traffic will be assessed based on the route and the time taken for the travel.

While trying out the new system, the Metro has already found gaps in its data and discovered that there is a big difference between the ridership figures recorded earlier by the Metro and the actual utilisation of the lines.

For instance, in the Botanical Garden stretch (Blue Line), it was observed that the average ridership figures were recorded as 40,000. However, when the utilisation of the line was assessed, it was observed that around 95,000 people were using it.

Similarly, in the Azadpur line (Pink and Yellow line intersection), the actual utilisation was found to be around 80,000 as against the 20,000 ridership average.

Singh said that the logistics were run on a pilot basis for several months and the results were matched with the passengers’ commute before this centralised monitoring software was rolled out.

Knowing the commuter movement pattern will also help the Metro improve facilities and will also be useful in planning routes in the upcoming sections of the Metro, Singh said. Once the data is procured, it will also give a better picture of crowding points and capacity can be increased there accordingly.

Prabuddha Sengupta, senior researcher of multi-modal systems of the world at IIT Delhi, said the collection of data becomes the first and the most important step in improving any service, and the more specific it is, the better are the results.

“It is yet to be seen how the traffic analysis of the Delhi Metro works, but in cities such as Tokyo, where it is already being done, data is used as a tool for planning, integration and expansion of the network. For example, if there is more crowd recorded in a particular station then the feeder services outside it will also be made more frequency accordingly for the ease of commuters,” he said.

With the opening of the new lines under Phase-III, the interchange facilities in the Metro have increased to 16 from 11 under phase-II. This increases the relevance of having a line-wise breakup of traffic.

As per the latest data by the DMRC, the average daily ridership of the Metro is 2.76 million. This figure had registered a dip after two fare revisions by the Metro in 2017.

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