KS Puttaswamy, original petitioner in right to privacy case, hails SC verdict

With the Supreme Court on Thursday declaring the Right to Privacy a fundamental right, retired Karnataka HC judge KS Puttaswamy, the original petitioner in the case, feels vindicated.

india Updated: Aug 25, 2017 14:16 IST
Vikram Gopal
Vikram Gopal
Hindustan Times, Bengaluru
Right to Privacy,Supreme Court,Bengaluru
The Supreme Court in New Delhi as seen on August 24. The apex court ruled that citizens have a constitutional right to privacy, a landmark verdict that could have wide-reaching implications for the government's flagship biometric programme.(AFP Photo)

With the Supreme Court on Thursday declaring the Right to Privacy a fundamental right, retired Karnataka HC judge KS Puttaswamy, the original petitioner in the case, feels vindicated.

Puttaswamy, 91, had in 2012 challenged the decision to make Aadhaar enrolment mandatory for all citizens. Speaking to HT, Puttaswamy called it a landmark judgment. “I am completely vindicated by the decision,” he said. “My contention had always been that Aadhaar enrolment can be made voluntary, in which case I would not have petitioned.”

Justice (retired) K S Puttaswamy (HT Photo)

Puttaswamy said it was the nature of information sought to be collected that first made him wary. “My contention was the collection of biometric data of all citizens by a private agency, without any suitable legislation to protect this data. At the same time, identity could be availed by illegal immigrants,” he said.

Puttaswamy was a judge of Karnataka HC from 1977 to 1988.

First Published: Aug 25, 2017 07:26 IST