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Home / India News / House strove for just social order: Supreme Court judge

House strove for just social order: Supreme Court judge

The judiciary, Justice Chandrachud said, has taken effective steps to adapt to the changing needs of society including the striking down of several colonial era provisions.

india Updated: Jul 13, 2020 02:29 IST
Murali Krishnan
Murali Krishnan
Hindustan Times, New Delhi
Supreme Court judge Justice DY Chandrachud was speaking at the celebration of birth centenary of his father.
Supreme Court judge Justice DY Chandrachud was speaking at the celebration of birth centenary of his father. (Ashok Dutta/HT File Photo )

The Indian Parliament has striven to achieve the vision of the Constitution for a just social order and laws providing right to information and food security are examples towards that end, Supreme Court judge Justice DY Chandrachud said on Sunday.

The Right to Information Act was enacted by Parliament in 2005 and empowers citizens to request information from any public authority. The Food Security Act came into force in 2013 and enables eligible households/ people to avail subsidized food grains.

“The judiciary has consistently endeavoured to align itself with the constitution’s underlying vision for a more just society. Parliament has similarly continued this aspiration by introducing social welfare legislations to ensure the RTI and the food security”, Justice Chandrachud said in his speech on ‘A changing society and Constitutional Continuity’.

He was speaking at the celebration of birth centenary of his father, former Chief Justice of India late YV Chandrachud. The event was organized by the Indian Law society and ILS Law College, Pune.

The judiciary, Justice Chandrachud said, has taken effective steps to adapt to the changing needs of society including the striking down of several colonial era provisions.

“The social vision of the constitution was nothing less than revolutionary but the political vision was based on an orderly transition governed by the rule of law,” he added.

In what he termed a “shrill discourse of polarized universe across the world”, Justice Chandrachud also issued a word of advice. “Humanity needs to gather together and remind ourselves of what we share. We may have myriad explanations to tell us why others are different from us but at the core of it all is our shared human identity,” he said.

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