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Monday, Nov 18, 2019

Goa government in choppy seas

The political crisis in Goa continues as efforts to salvage the Cong-led Govt remained inconclusive tonight.

india Updated: Jan 18, 2008 03:06 IST

Agencies
Hindustantimes
         

The political crisis in Goa continued for the second day as efforts to salvage the Congress-led coalition government shifted to Delhi after crucial talks remained inconclusive on Thursday night.

Armed with a mandate from NCP supremo Sharad Pawar, party leader Praful Patel held hectic parleys with his three MLAs and an Independent Visvajit Rane asking them not to press for withdrawal of support to the seven-month-old government which has been reduced to a minority.

Patel said the talks will resume in Delhi on Friday.

Chief Minister Digamber Kamat was also present at the meeting during when the four MLAs, of whom three were ministers who resigned, raised some issues.

The four legislators said they were not happy at the functioning of the Kamat government. Rane however toned down his rhetoric saying he had no problems with the leadership and that he did not want to create a crisis but said some issues needed to be addressed by the Chief Minister.

Patel, who is also a Union Minister, told reporters that further talks will be held in Delhi as he expressed confidence of finding a solution.

Congress leaders PR Dasmushi and BK Hariprasad expressed confidence that the crisis will blow over.

Leaders of the Congress and its ally Nationalist Congress Party (NCP) rushed to this state capital on Thursday, a day after resignations of three ministers and a supporting legislator put the government in minority.

Formed in June 2007 after elections, the Kamat government was facing rebellion from an unspecified number of rebels - at least three of whom had come out openly and quit as ministers.