No more skinning, burying dead cows, Rajasthan gaushala gets gas-fired crematorium | jaipur | Hindustan Times
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No more skinning, burying dead cows, Rajasthan gaushala gets gas-fired crematorium

The gas-fired crematorium costs Rs15 lakh and cremating a dead cow will require two and half commercial cylinders of gas and will cost a little more than Rs 2,000.

jaipur Updated: Oct 09, 2017 21:10 IST
Salik Ahmad
The gas crematory being installed at the Shri Gopal Gaushala in Jhunjhunu.
The gas crematory being installed at the Shri Gopal Gaushala in Jhunjhunu. (HT Photo)

 A gaushala or cow shelter in Rajasthan’s Jhunjhunu is in the process of installing a gas-fired crematorium to cremate dead cows.

The Rs 15 lakh machine has reached the Shri Gopal Gaushala and will be installed in the next couple of days, says Subhash Chandra Kyamsaria, secretary of the cow shelter that runs on donations for its upkeep.

“It pained me to see dead cows being skinned for leather,” he says.

“When we regard the cow as our mother, can’t we even make arrangements for a proper funeral of the cow?”

Earlier, civic officials used to collect the carcass from the shelter and the dead cows were skinned before being disposed of. The district does not have any gas or electric-fired crematoria for cremating humans.

A tender was floated inviting quotations from different firms for setting up a customised gas-fired crematorium for cows and a Faridabad-based firm bagged the contract for installing it, which will cost an additional Rs 5 lakh, Kyamsaria says.

“There were a number of firms offering electric crematories but we went for a gas-fired one as the bones do not get completely burnt in an electric one.”

Cremating a dead cow will require two and half commercial cylinders of gas and will cost a little more than Rs 2,000 and only one carcass will be cremated at a time.

The cow shelter, spread across 2.5 hectare, is home to more than 1,200 cows of which 180 are milch cows. The cow shelter, spread across 2.5 hectare, is home to more than 1,200 cows of which 180 are milch cows. The revenue generated from cow milk covers about 30% of the running expense of the shelter, while the remaining expense is met by donations.

A number of old and diseased cows are also brought to the shelter throughout the year and as a result of which more than 200 cow deaths take place at the shelter every year, says Kyamsaria.

The shelter already has showers for bathing cows and a music system on which bhajans --Hindu religious hymns- are played when the cows are milked.

The shelter management believes that bhajans boost the production of cow milk.

Kyamsaria further says that ashes produced from the crematory will be used as fertilizer for plants and trees in the cow shelter.

“We want to make the gaushala a model for all the other gaushalas in the country.”

The Bharatiya Janata Party-ruled state has a separate department for welfare of cows—gopalan department. The cow is considered a sacred animal by a majority of Hindus.

“As far as I know, this is the first gas or electric-fired crematorium for cows in the state,” says Dr Ashok Kumar Gautam, joint director of state gopalan department.