Mumbai civic body budget: Projects in the past five years implemented poorly | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Mumbai civic body budget: Projects in the past five years implemented poorly

An analysis of the past five years of BMC budgets reveal that at least 10 projects aimed at improving the amenities are still to be implemented.

mumbai Updated: Jan 30, 2018 10:38 IST
Sanjana Bhalerao
Only six big projects that have been mentioned in the past five budgets have begun.
Only six big projects that have been mentioned in the past five budgets have begun.(HT File )

The civic body is all set to announce yet another budget on Friday. But have you ever wondered why Mumbai’s roads are poor, why the city’s infrastructure is still rickety, why the gardens and playgrounds are in a pitiable condition and landfills are overflowing with garbage even though the Mumbai’s civic body is known to be the richest in the country? Here is why.

An analysis of the past five years of Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation’s (BMC) budgets reveals that at least 10 projects aimed at improving the amenities are still to be implemented, although they are mentioned every year.

The proposed projects — such as the big ticket coastal road, Goregaon-Mulund link road (GMLR), the construction of a 12-acre sports complex at Andheri, swimming pools across the city, Gargai-Pinjal dams, Deonar waste to energy plant, waste processing at Mulund, hawker policy, a banner-free Mumbai and 26 new fire stations — have not even started construction yet.

Only six big projects that have been mentioned in the past five budgets have begun. These include the central government’s Swachh Bharat Abhiyan, earlier known as ‘Clean Mumbai, Green Mumbai’ project, a fire safety cell — it was activated post the Kamala Mills fire tragedy — encroachment removal along the Tansa pipeline and the pedestrian first policy.

Civic chief Ajoy Mehta, ahead of the budget presentation on February 2, has now asked the civic departments to chalk out a timeline to clear 41 pending projects, specifying the date of issuing bids, selection process for the bidder and the estimated construction and completion dates. It is now anticipated that the completion of pending projects may sideline new projects proposed for the upcoming year. Citizen analysts welcomed the move.

“It is essential that each and every department has a deadline-oriented plan when it comes to the budget. The BMC can provide a realistic picture for its budget expenditure,” said Milind Mhaske, project director, Praja foundation, a non-partisan organisation, which works towards bringing in accountability and transparency in governance.