Photos: SC bans sale of firecrackers, earthen lamps set to light Diwali

As the Supreme Court bans the sale of firecrackers in Delhi NCR, earthen lamps or diyas will be in demand as people aim to celebrate an environment-friendly Diwali. A potter's colony in Uttam Nagar is hard at work, producing these lamps from scratch.

UPDATED ON OCT 11, 2017 05:43 PM IST 9 Photos
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Located on the periphery of western Delhi in Uttam Nagar’s potter’s colony, generations have been using clay to mould earthen lamps, idols of deities and other festive ornaments. With the sale of firecrackers banned in Delhi and Diwali just around the corner, the production of these earthen lamps is on the rise. (Burhaan Kinu / HT PHOTO)

Located on the periphery of western Delhi in Uttam Nagar’s potter’s colony, generations have been using clay to mould earthen lamps, idols of deities and other festive ornaments. With the sale of firecrackers banned in Delhi and Diwali just around the corner, the production of these earthen lamps is on the rise. (Burhaan Kinu / HT PHOTO)

UPDATED ON OCT 11, 2017 05:43 PM IST
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The initial process involves sieving the soil and making slurry from clay and water. This clay when mixed with the right amount of water forms a cohesive mass which when moulded and baked retains its shape. (Burhaan Kinu / HT PHOTO)

The initial process involves sieving the soil and making slurry from clay and water. This clay when mixed with the right amount of water forms a cohesive mass which when moulded and baked retains its shape. (Burhaan Kinu / HT PHOTO)

UPDATED ON OCT 11, 2017 05:43 PM IST
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Once the clay is pliable, the solid mass is pressed onto a potter’s wheel and shaped gently upwards and outwards to give it a definitive shape. The moulding process is an intrinsic work of hand requiring mastery over the potter’s skill of creating symmetry. (Burhaan Kinu / HT PHOTO)

Once the clay is pliable, the solid mass is pressed onto a potter’s wheel and shaped gently upwards and outwards to give it a definitive shape. The moulding process is an intrinsic work of hand requiring mastery over the potter’s skill of creating symmetry. (Burhaan Kinu / HT PHOTO)

UPDATED ON OCT 11, 2017 05:43 PM IST
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Potters lend shape to a piece of earthen ware on an electric powered wheel. In India, since the Neolithic age, pottery has been a part of household tradition (especially among the women) and with time, the process adapted to the use of electric wheels, kilning and other technological innovations. (Burhaan Kinu / HT PHOTO)

Potters lend shape to a piece of earthen ware on an electric powered wheel. In India, since the Neolithic age, pottery has been a part of household tradition (especially among the women) and with time, the process adapted to the use of electric wheels, kilning and other technological innovations. (Burhaan Kinu / HT PHOTO)

UPDATED ON OCT 11, 2017 05:43 PM IST
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Once shaped, the pottery is left out in the sun to dry. The potter then adds finishing touches and dips the product in red soil. For a hereditary occupation that has been passed down generations, urbanisation and the influence of modern education have struck the roots of potter families, with many youths from the community shifting to other professions. (Burhaan Kinu / HT PHOTO)

Once shaped, the pottery is left out in the sun to dry. The potter then adds finishing touches and dips the product in red soil. For a hereditary occupation that has been passed down generations, urbanisation and the influence of modern education have struck the roots of potter families, with many youths from the community shifting to other professions. (Burhaan Kinu / HT PHOTO)

UPDATED ON OCT 11, 2017 05:43 PM IST
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The heating process involves the use of clay ovens or kilns and is fuelled by burning wood husk, which is known to release harmful toxins into the air, causing respiratory diseases such as asthma and bronchitis. Few months ago, the potter’s colony had come under the NGT scanner for contributing to air pollution in the capital. (Burhaan Kinu / HT PHOTO)

The heating process involves the use of clay ovens or kilns and is fuelled by burning wood husk, which is known to release harmful toxins into the air, causing respiratory diseases such as asthma and bronchitis. Few months ago, the potter’s colony had come under the NGT scanner for contributing to air pollution in the capital. (Burhaan Kinu / HT PHOTO)

UPDATED ON OCT 11, 2017 05:43 PM IST
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A view of the atmosphere engulfed with smoke during the heating process in Uttam Nagar’s potter’s colony, which houses over 500 families. (Burhaan Kinu / HT PHOTO)

A view of the atmosphere engulfed with smoke during the heating process in Uttam Nagar’s potter’s colony, which houses over 500 families. (Burhaan Kinu / HT PHOTO)

UPDATED ON OCT 11, 2017 05:43 PM IST
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A child poses with finished earthen lamps in Uttam Nagar, New Delhi. The Supreme Court’s ban on the sale of firecrackers in and around New Delhi ahead of Diwali in a pre-emptive step to stop a toxic haze from engulfing the region like last year has dampened the festive mood for many in the state. (Burhaan Kinu / HT PHOTO)

A child poses with finished earthen lamps in Uttam Nagar, New Delhi. The Supreme Court’s ban on the sale of firecrackers in and around New Delhi ahead of Diwali in a pre-emptive step to stop a toxic haze from engulfing the region like last year has dampened the festive mood for many in the state. (Burhaan Kinu / HT PHOTO)

UPDATED ON OCT 11, 2017 05:43 PM IST
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A boy paints earthen lamps as part of finishing touches on products to be sold in the market. The ban on firecrackers is a step towards a potentially greener and less hazardous Diwali this year. (Burhaan Kinu / HT PHOTO)

A boy paints earthen lamps as part of finishing touches on products to be sold in the market. The ban on firecrackers is a step towards a potentially greener and less hazardous Diwali this year. (Burhaan Kinu / HT PHOTO)

UPDATED ON OCT 11, 2017 05:43 PM IST
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