How to deal with difficult family relationships: Therapist shares tips | Hindustan Times
close_game
close_game

How to deal with difficult family relationships: Therapist shares tips

Published on Apr 20, 2024 03:06 PM IST
  • From not normalising unhealthy behaviour to setting clear boundaries, here are a few ways to deal with difficult family members.
1 / 6
When we deal with difficult family dynamics, it can make us feel anxious and overwhelmed. "When living with Complex PTSD, small, consistent actions lead to big changes. Focusing on one strategy at a time allows it to become comfortable and natural, building your internal strength and resilience. This process isn't just about improving family relationships; it's about empowering yourself, reinforcing your boundaries, and nurturing your well-being," wrote Therapist Linda Meredith.(Unsplash) expand-icon View Photos in a new improved layout
Published on Apr 20, 2024 03:06 PM IST

When we deal with difficult family dynamics, it can make us feel anxious and overwhelmed. "When living with Complex PTSD, small, consistent actions lead to big changes. Focusing on one strategy at a time allows it to become comfortable and natural, building your internal strength and resilience. This process isn't just about improving family relationships; it's about empowering yourself, reinforcing your boundaries, and nurturing your well-being," wrote Therapist Linda Meredith.(Unsplash)

2 / 6
We need to set clear boundaries even in family. We should let them know the things that are non-negotiable for us. (Unsplash) expand-icon View Photos in a new improved layout
Published on Apr 20, 2024 03:06 PM IST

We need to set clear boundaries even in family. We should let them know the things that are non-negotiable for us. (Unsplash)

3 / 6
In case of situations when we need some closure, we should strive to receive it from our end. Not getting closure can make us feel anxious. (Unsplash) expand-icon View Photos in a new improved layout
Published on Apr 20, 2024 03:06 PM IST

In case of situations when we need some closure, we should strive to receive it from our end. Not getting closure can make us feel anxious. (Unsplash)

4 / 6
We do not need to fix someone. When we take up the role of the fixer, we often do things at the expense of our mental health. (Unsplash) expand-icon View Photos in a new improved layout
Published on Apr 20, 2024 03:06 PM IST

We do not need to fix someone. When we take up the role of the fixer, we often do things at the expense of our mental health. (Unsplash)

5 / 6
Childhood emotional neglect has a deep impact on people and their adult relationships as well. When we are brought up around parents and caregivers with less or no affection for us, we tend to carry that trauma in the later stages of our lives as well. "The absence of emotional support during childhood can be just as harmful and long-lasting as other traumatic experiences. However, because it's not easy to pinpoint when and where the emotional wounds occurred, it can be challenging to recognise and overcome them.⁣⁣," wrote Therapist Emmylou Antonieth Seaman.(Unsplash) expand-icon View Photos in a new improved layout
Published on Apr 20, 2024 03:06 PM IST

Childhood emotional neglect has a deep impact on people and their adult relationships as well. When we are brought up around parents and caregivers with less or no affection for us, we tend to carry that trauma in the later stages of our lives as well. "The absence of emotional support during childhood can be just as harmful and long-lasting as other traumatic experiences. However, because it's not easy to pinpoint when and where the emotional wounds occurred, it can be challenging to recognise and overcome them.⁣⁣," wrote Therapist Emmylou Antonieth Seaman.(Unsplash)

6 / 6
Unhealthy behaviour, at no time, should be normalised or excused, just because it comes from a family member. We should address it right then and there. (Freepik) expand-icon View Photos in a new improved layout
Published on Apr 20, 2024 03:06 PM IST

Unhealthy behaviour, at no time, should be normalised or excused, just because it comes from a family member. We should address it right then and there. (Freepik)

SHARE
Story Saved
Live Score
Saved Articles
Following
My Reads
Sign out
New Delhi 0C
Wednesday, May 22, 2024
Start 14 Days Free Trial Subscribe Now
Follow Us On