Photos: Delhi’s iconic trees in the wake of SC’s report on “valuation of trees”

  • A tree’s monetary worth is its age multiplied by 74,500, a Supreme Court-appointed committee has submitted in a report, setting a guideline, for the first time in India, on the valuation of trees. The five-member committee of experts added that a heritage tree with a lifespan of well over 100 years could be valued at more than 1 crore -- and that the monetary value of a project, for which hundreds of trees are cut, is sometimes far less than the economic and environmental worth of the felled trees. In 2018, HT ran a long photographic series on the gorgeous trees of Delhi, and here’s looking back at some of the best from then.
UPDATED ON FEB 04, 2021 03:46 PM IST 12 Photos
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The Salvadora tree in the Qutub Minar complex gives the popular monument quite the fight for attention.(Burhaan Kinu / HT Archive)

The Salvadora tree in the Qutub Minar complex gives the popular monument quite the fight for attention.(Burhaan Kinu / HT Archive)

UPDATED ON FEB 04, 2021 03:46 PM IST
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The sprawling and majestic semal tree on the front lawn of Teen Murti Bhavan, former residence of Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru finds favour with everyone who visits the museum and library even today. When in full bloom, bright red flowers occupy it, making it, arguably, Delhi's most beautiful springtime offering.(Raj K Raj / HT Archive)

The sprawling and majestic semal tree on the front lawn of Teen Murti Bhavan, former residence of Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru finds favour with everyone who visits the museum and library even today. When in full bloom, bright red flowers occupy it, making it, arguably, Delhi's most beautiful springtime offering.(Raj K Raj / HT Archive)

UPDATED ON FEB 04, 2021 03:46 PM IST
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Delhi's tallest Jamun tree is in Qudsia Bagh. This tree retains its lush crown through the dry season.(Sanchit Khanna / HT Archive)

Delhi's tallest Jamun tree is in Qudsia Bagh. This tree retains its lush crown through the dry season.(Sanchit Khanna / HT Archive)

UPDATED ON FEB 04, 2021 03:46 PM IST
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The Ailanthus tree, also known as the Maha Neem, is one of the biggest and oldest trees in the ruins of the Tughklalabad fort in New Delhi.(Burhaan Kinu / HT Archive)

The Ailanthus tree, also known as the Maha Neem, is one of the biggest and oldest trees in the ruins of the Tughklalabad fort in New Delhi.(Burhaan Kinu / HT Archive)

UPDATED ON FEB 04, 2021 03:46 PM IST
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The grand Peepal tree inside the Lodhi gardens, also known as the Bodhi tree and recognisable by its heart-shaped leaves, is sacred to various faiths.(Burhaan Kinu / HT Archive)

The grand Peepal tree inside the Lodhi gardens, also known as the Bodhi tree and recognisable by its heart-shaped leaves, is sacred to various faiths.(Burhaan Kinu / HT Archive)

UPDATED ON FEB 04, 2021 03:46 PM IST
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This old Pilkhan tree serves as a pit stop for commuters in Chandni Chowk. Locals say it was planted in the 1960s, but to determine its exact age is hard because of the way the Pilkhan's roots envelop its trunk.(Sanchit Khanna/ HT Archive)

This old Pilkhan tree serves as a pit stop for commuters in Chandni Chowk. Locals say it was planted in the 1960s, but to determine its exact age is hard because of the way the Pilkhan's roots envelop its trunk.(Sanchit Khanna/ HT Archive)

UPDATED ON FEB 04, 2021 03:46 PM IST
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A row of Lemon-scented Gum trees, locally known as Safeda, are seen inside St. Stephen's College. These tall trees bear pink or grey barks and the leaves smell of crushed odomos.(Raj K Raj / HT Archive)

A row of Lemon-scented Gum trees, locally known as Safeda, are seen inside St. Stephen's College. These tall trees bear pink or grey barks and the leaves smell of crushed odomos.(Raj K Raj / HT Archive)

UPDATED ON FEB 04, 2021 03:46 PM IST
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A view of the Saptaparni or Shaitan ka jhad outside the IIC Lounge in New Delhi. It was first planted in Delhi in the late 1940s.(Sanchit Khanna / HT Archive)

A view of the Saptaparni or Shaitan ka jhad outside the IIC Lounge in New Delhi. It was first planted in Delhi in the late 1940s.(Sanchit Khanna / HT Archive)

UPDATED ON FEB 04, 2021 03:46 PM IST
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This gorgeous old Pakad tree inside the Red Fort complex has long aerial roots like the banyan. A beautiful shade tree found in the city, this common strangler fig is a treat for the eyes in the month of April.(Sanchit Khanna / HT Archive)

This gorgeous old Pakad tree inside the Red Fort complex has long aerial roots like the banyan. A beautiful shade tree found in the city, this common strangler fig is a treat for the eyes in the month of April.(Sanchit Khanna / HT Archive)

UPDATED ON FEB 04, 2021 03:46 PM IST
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The Ficus Benjamina or the Weeping Fig is a handsome, evergreen tree with glossy leaves. Here seen inside the Supreme Court compound, its figs come without stalks and are bright red in colour.(Burhaan Kinu/ HT Archive)

The Ficus Benjamina or the Weeping Fig is a handsome, evergreen tree with glossy leaves. Here seen inside the Supreme Court compound, its figs come without stalks and are bright red in colour.(Burhaan Kinu/ HT Archive)

UPDATED ON FEB 04, 2021 03:46 PM IST
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The Ronjh, or the Acacia leucophloea, is a remnant tree at the Lodhi Garden. An important part of Delhi's native flora, this thorny tree can be quite a vision late in the monsoon season as spherical clusters of flowers hang on to branch extremities.(Burhaan Kinu/ HT Archive)

The Ronjh, or the Acacia leucophloea, is a remnant tree at the Lodhi Garden. An important part of Delhi's native flora, this thorny tree can be quite a vision late in the monsoon season as spherical clusters of flowers hang on to branch extremities.(Burhaan Kinu/ HT Archive)

UPDATED ON FEB 04, 2021 03:46 PM IST
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The enormous, majestic Pilkhan tree stands tall amidst the ruins of Feroz Shah Kotla. A strangler fig with roots that bend backward to envelop the branches, this is one of the city’s most beautiful trees.(Raj K Raj / HT Archive)

The enormous, majestic Pilkhan tree stands tall amidst the ruins of Feroz Shah Kotla. A strangler fig with roots that bend backward to envelop the branches, this is one of the city’s most beautiful trees.(Raj K Raj / HT Archive)

UPDATED ON FEB 04, 2021 03:46 PM IST
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