Photos: Indonesian students and workers protest new labour law

Indonesian police detained nearly 400 protesters on October 7, the second day of heated demonstrations over a controversial new labour reform law in Southeast Asia's largest economy. The protesters are demanding the government revokes an "omnibus" jobs creation law that has outraged unions, who say it lopsidedly favours businesses and will hurt workers and the environment. The sweeping legislation has been championed by President Joko Widodo as key to boosting an economy hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic by cutting red tape and attracting foreign investment.

Updated On Oct 08, 2020 11:29 AM IST
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A demonstrator looks at police officers following a protest against a new labour reform bill outside Regional People's Representative Assembly building in Bandung, Indonesia on October 7. Authorities in Bandung, the capital of West Java province, blocked streets leading to the local parliament building and city hall, where clashes between students and riot police broke out late on October 6 when police tried to disperse the protesters. (Novrian Arbi / Antara Foto via REUTERS)
Updated on Oct 08, 2020 11:29 AM IST

A demonstrator looks at police officers following a protest against a new labour reform bill outside Regional People's Representative Assembly building in Bandung, Indonesia on October 7. Authorities in Bandung, the capital of West Java province, blocked streets leading to the local parliament building and city hall, where clashes between students and riot police broke out late on October 6 when police tried to disperse the protesters. (Novrian Arbi / Antara Foto via REUTERS)

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Police officers fire tear gas towards student protesters in Bandung on October 7. Thousands of Indonesian students and workers were out in protest for the second day on October 7 against a new law they say will cripple labour rights and harm the environment. (Kusumadireza / AP)
Updated on Oct 08, 2020 11:29 AM IST

Police officers fire tear gas towards student protesters in Bandung on October 7. Thousands of Indonesian students and workers were out in protest for the second day on October 7 against a new law they say will cripple labour rights and harm the environment. (Kusumadireza / AP)

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Riot police use a water cannon to disperse student protesters on the second day of a three-day strike by labourers against a government omnibus bill on job creation, in Bandung on October 7. More than 3,000 protesters attempted to reach the heavily guarded parliament. Protesters set fires to tires near blocked streets and pelted police with rocks and gasoline bombs and broke down a gate of the parliament compound. (Timur Matahari / AFP)
Updated on Oct 08, 2020 11:29 AM IST

Riot police use a water cannon to disperse student protesters on the second day of a three-day strike by labourers against a government omnibus bill on job creation, in Bandung on October 7. More than 3,000 protesters attempted to reach the heavily guarded parliament. Protesters set fires to tires near blocked streets and pelted police with rocks and gasoline bombs and broke down a gate of the parliament compound. (Timur Matahari / AFP)

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University students protest the government's labour reforms bill in Tangerang, on the outskirts of Jakarta on October 7. Smaller protests also occurred in other Indonesian cities, including in Jakarta’s satellite cities of Tangerang and Bekasi where large factories are located, and many cities on Sumatra and Sulawesi islands. (Fauzan / Antra Foto via REUTERS)
Updated on Oct 08, 2020 11:29 AM IST

University students protest the government's labour reforms bill in Tangerang, on the outskirts of Jakarta on October 7. Smaller protests also occurred in other Indonesian cities, including in Jakarta’s satellite cities of Tangerang and Bekasi where large factories are located, and many cities on Sumatra and Sulawesi islands. (Fauzan / Antra Foto via REUTERS)

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A student holds a that reads “the motherland is on stand up comedy,” in Tangerang on October 7. The new Job Creation Law, which was approved October 5, is expected to bring radical changes to Indonesia’s labour system and natural resources management. It amended 79 previous laws, including the Labour Law, the Spatial Planning Law and Environmental Management Law. (Fajrin Raharjo / AFP)
Updated on Oct 08, 2020 11:29 AM IST

A student holds a that reads “the motherland is on stand up comedy,” in Tangerang on October 7. The new Job Creation Law, which was approved October 5, is expected to bring radical changes to Indonesia’s labour system and natural resources management. It amended 79 previous laws, including the Labour Law, the Spatial Planning Law and Environmental Management Law. (Fajrin Raharjo / AFP)

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Demonstrators and police officers face off during a protest against the government's labour reforms outside Regional People's Representative Assembly building in Semarang on October 7. The new law is intended to improve bureaucratic efficiency and cut red tape as part of efforts by President Joko Widodo’s administration to attract more investment in the vast archipelago nation, home to more than 270 million people. (Aji Styawan / Antara Foto via REUTERS)
Updated on Oct 08, 2020 11:29 AM IST

Demonstrators and police officers face off during a protest against the government's labour reforms outside Regional People's Representative Assembly building in Semarang on October 7. The new law is intended to improve bureaucratic efficiency and cut red tape as part of efforts by President Joko Widodo’s administration to attract more investment in the vast archipelago nation, home to more than 270 million people. (Aji Styawan / Antara Foto via REUTERS)

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Members of Indonesian trade unions protest the government's labour reforms bill in Tangerang on October 7. The Confederation of Indonesian Trade Unions, known as KSPI, has released a statement saying the new law will hurt workers, including by reducing severance pay, removing restrictions on manual labour by foreign workers, increasing the use of outsourcing, and converting monthly wages into hourly wages. (Fauzan / Antara Foto via REUTERS)
Updated on Oct 08, 2020 11:29 AM IST

Members of Indonesian trade unions protest the government's labour reforms bill in Tangerang on October 7. The Confederation of Indonesian Trade Unions, known as KSPI, has released a statement saying the new law will hurt workers, including by reducing severance pay, removing restrictions on manual labour by foreign workers, increasing the use of outsourcing, and converting monthly wages into hourly wages. (Fauzan / Antara Foto via REUTERS)

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University students protest the government's labour reforms bill in Tangerang on October 7. Last year, Widodo told The Associated Press that he will push ahead with sweeping and potentially unpopular economic reforms, including a more business-friendly labour law, in his final term because he is no longer constrained by politics. (Fauzan / Antara Foto via REUTERS)
Updated on Oct 08, 2020 11:29 AM IST

University students protest the government's labour reforms bill in Tangerang on October 7. Last year, Widodo told The Associated Press that he will push ahead with sweeping and potentially unpopular economic reforms, including a more business-friendly labour law, in his final term because he is no longer constrained by politics. (Fauzan / Antara Foto via REUTERS)

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