[

scientist

]
PAGE 2
There are two kinds of photosynthesis: C3 and C4. Most food crops depend on C3 photosynthesis where carbon is fixed into sugar inside cells called ‘mesophyll’ where oxygen is abundant. (Representational Image)(Unsplash)

During Covid, scientists turn to computers to understand C4 photosynthesis

Washington [US] | By Asian News International | Posted by Jahnavi Gupta
UPDATED ON OCT 16, 2020 07:47 PM IST
Scientists wanted to find out how C4 crops are able to express several important enzymes inside bundle sheath cells instead of the mesophyll.
Based on recent reported rates of household groundwater use for rural and urban areas, they estimate that about 18–30 million people in India are currently at risk of high exposure to arsenic through their drinking water supply.(HT Photo)
Based on recent reported rates of household groundwater use for rural and urban areas, they estimate that about 18–30 million people in India are currently at risk of high exposure to arsenic through their drinking water supply.(HT Photo)

Scientists identify new potential groundwater ‘arsenic hotspots’ in India

New Delhi | By Press Trust of India| Posted by Susmita Pakrasi
PUBLISHED ON OCT 15, 2020 02:47 PM IST
Arsenic in drinking water obtained from wells is the cause of severe health outcomes, including premature deaths from cancers and cardiovascular disease in many parts of the world and particularly in the Indian subcontinent, the researchers said.
SADS-COV is also distinct from two circulating common cold alphacoronaviruses in humans, HCoV-229E and HCoV-NL63(AP)
SADS-COV is also distinct from two circulating common cold alphacoronaviruses in humans, HCoV-229E and HCoV-NL63(AP)

Scientists reveal potential of swine coronavirus jumping from animals to people

Washington | By Press Trust of India| Posted by Susmita Pakrasi
PUBLISHED ON OCT 14, 2020 02:27 PM IST
In the new study, published in the journal PNAS, the scientists conducted lab tests to assess the potential threat from SADS-CoV to people, and found that the virus efficiently replicates in human liver and gut cells, as well as airway cells.
“We conducted measurements for a whole year with just a short break.” (Representational Image)(Unsplash)
“We conducted measurements for a whole year with just a short break.” (Representational Image)(Unsplash)

Scientists return from Arctic with wealth of climate data

Berlin | By Associated Press | Posted by Jahnavi Gupta
UPDATED ON OCT 12, 2020 02:39 PM IST
An icebreaker carrying scientists on a year-long international effort to study the high Arctic has returned to its home port in Germany carrying a wealth of data that will help researchers better predict climate change in the decades to come.
The study, published in the journal Science, points to the IgG class of antibodies as the longest-lasting antibodies detectable in the patients during this time frame, and may serve as promising targets to detect and evaluate immune responses against the SARS-CoV-2 virus.(HT File Photo)
The study, published in the journal Science, points to the IgG class of antibodies as the longest-lasting antibodies detectable in the patients during this time frame, and may serve as promising targets to detect and evaluate immune responses against the SARS-CoV-2 virus.(HT File Photo)

Scientists detect long-lived antibodies in blood, saliva samples from Covid-19 patients

New York | By Press Trust of India| Posted by Susmita Pakrasi
UPDATED ON OCT 09, 2020 03:27 PM IST
The scientists focused only on antibodies specific to the receptor binding domain of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein which it uses to enter host cells.
Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the United States explained to the world these dead ends of the cosmos.(Unsplash)
Roger Penrose of Britain, Reinhard Genzel of Germany and Andrea Ghez of the United States explained to the world these dead ends of the cosmos.(Unsplash)

3 scientists win Nobel physics prize for black hole research

Stockholm | By Associated Press | Posted by Jahnavi Gupta
UPDATED ON OCT 07, 2020 06:44 PM IST
Three scientists won the Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday for establishing the all-too-weird reality of black holes — the straight-out-of-science-fiction cosmic monsters that suck up light and time and will eventually swallow us, too.
Global year-to-date temperatures show little deviation from 2016, the warmest calendar year recorded so far. (Representational Image)(Pixabay)
Global year-to-date temperatures show little deviation from 2016, the warmest calendar year recorded so far. (Representational Image)(Pixabay)

Scientists say 2020 may smash heat record

By Bloomberg | Posted by Jahnavi Gupta
UPDATED ON OCT 07, 2020 03:07 PM IST
Climate scientists warned 2020 could be the world’s hottest year on record, with September temperatures eclipsing previous highs and Arctic ice retreating from the seas it usually covers.
The team used the study of different water molecular species in human breath, also called ‘Breathomics’ method, to explore different water isotopes in human exhaled breath. (Representational Image)(Unsplash)
The team used the study of different water molecular species in human breath, also called ‘Breathomics’ method, to explore different water isotopes in human exhaled breath. (Representational Image)(Unsplash)

Indian scientists find method for early diagnosis of peptic ulcer-causing bacteria

New Delhi | By Press Trust of India | Posted by Jahnavi Gupta
UPDATED ON OCT 04, 2020 01:58 PM IST
Scientists at the S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences in Kolkata have found a method for early diagnosis of a peptic ulcer-causing bacteria with the help of a biomarker called ‘BreathPrint’ found in the breath.
The scientists believe the findings could explain why prognosis is worse in men than in women with Covid-19.(Unsplash)
The scientists believe the findings could explain why prognosis is worse in men than in women with Covid-19.(Unsplash)

Covid-19 may deplete testosterone, say scientists

Dubai | By Press Trust of India | Posted by Jahnavi Gupta
UPDATED ON SEP 30, 2020 02:13 PM IST
Covid-19 disease might deteriorate men’s testosterone levels, according to a new study which says low levels of the hormone could be a cause for poor prognosis following a positive test for the novel coronavirus.
The plan to publish interim results based on the first 42 days of monitoring volunteers means Russia has a high chance of becoming the first worldwide to announce any data from a final-stage trial, which is known as Phase III.(REUTERS)
The plan to publish interim results based on the first 42 days of monitoring volunteers means Russia has a high chance of becoming the first worldwide to announce any data from a final-stage trial, which is known as Phase III.(REUTERS)

Russian scientist behind Covid-19 vaccine defends ‘wartime’ roll-out

Reuters | By Reuters| Posted by Susmita Pakrasi
UPDATED ON SEP 29, 2020 12:23 PM IST
Alexander Gintsburg, head of the Gamaleya Institute that produced the Sputnik V vaccine, told Reuters that the pace of its development was necessary under the “wartime” conditions of a pandemic but no corners were being cut.
The findings, published in the journal Frontiers in Microbiology, go against the currently predominant views of the role of both viruses and these groups of single-celled organisms called protists in the marine food webs.(Unsplash)
The findings, published in the journal Frontiers in Microbiology, go against the currently predominant views of the role of both viruses and these groups of single-celled organisms called protists in the marine food webs.(Unsplash)

Scientists find evidence of virus-eating microorganisms

New York | By Press Trust of India | Posted by Jahnavi Gupta
UPDATED ON SEP 28, 2020 08:24 PM IST
Scientists have found the first compelling evidence that two groups of ecologically important marine microorganisms could be eating viruses -- catching their “prey” and engulfing them, an advance that may lead to a better understanding of the flow of organic matter in the oceans.
TOPSHOT - A firefighter watches the Bobcat Fire burning on hillsides near Monrovia Canyon Park in Monrovia, California on September 15, 2020. - A major fire that has been raging outside Los Angeles for more than a week threatened to engulf a historic observatory and billion-dollar broadcast towers on September 15 as firefighters struggled to contain the flames. The so-called Bobcat Fire was within 500 feet (150 meters) from the 116-year-old Mt. Wilson Observatory, the US Forest Service said in a tweet, while fire officials said crews were in place "ready to receive the fire." (Representational)(AFP)
TOPSHOT - A firefighter watches the Bobcat Fire burning on hillsides near Monrovia Canyon Park in Monrovia, California on September 15, 2020. - A major fire that has been raging outside Los Angeles for more than a week threatened to engulf a historic observatory and billion-dollar broadcast towers on September 15 as firefighters struggled to contain the flames. The so-called Bobcat Fire was within 500 feet (150 meters) from the 116-year-old Mt. Wilson Observatory, the US Forest Service said in a tweet, while fire officials said crews were in place "ready to receive the fire." (Representational)(AFP)

These scientists are studying why California keeps burning

Bloomberg | By Bloomberg | Posted by: Alfea Jamal
UPDATED ON SEP 16, 2020 09:49 PM IST
As fire last week taunted Paradise, California, destroyed in the 2018 Camp Fire, many others have found themselves asking a related, but much more complicated question: How can this be happening again?” California burns. Everybody knows that. But why does it seem like forests are igniting more often?
A health worker collects a nasal swab sample to test for COVID-19 at a government hospital in Jammu, India, Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020. India's coronavirus cases are now the second-highest in the world and only behind the United States.(AP)
A health worker collects a nasal swab sample to test for COVID-19 at a government hospital in Jammu, India, Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020. India's coronavirus cases are now the second-highest in the world and only behind the United States.(AP)

Coronavirus pandemic: Scientists predict that Covid-19 will become a seasonal virus, but not yet

Washington DC | By Asian News International | Posted by: Alfea Jamal
UPDATED ON SEP 15, 2020 05:04 PM IST
A new review published in Frontiers in Public Health suggests that COVID-19, the illness caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, will likely become seasonal in countries with temperate climates, but only when herd immunity is attained.
This 2020 photo provided by Tanisha Williams shows her in Lewisburg, Pa. Williams, a botanist at Bucknell University, knows exactly which plants she's looking for. But after being questioned by strangers in public parks, Williams, who is Black, has started carrying her field guides with her. “I've been quizzed by random strangers,” she said. “Now I bring my wildflower books and botanical field guides, trying to look like a scientist. It’s for other people. I wouldn’t otherwise lug these books.”(AP)
This 2020 photo provided by Tanisha Williams shows her in Lewisburg, Pa. Williams, a botanist at Bucknell University, knows exactly which plants she's looking for. But after being questioned by strangers in public parks, Williams, who is Black, has started carrying her field guides with her. “I've been quizzed by random strangers,” she said. “Now I bring my wildflower books and botanical field guides, trying to look like a scientist. It’s for other people. I wouldn’t otherwise lug these books.”(AP)

Black scientists highlight racism in the lab and the field

Washington | By Press Trust of India | Posted by Shankhyaneel Sarkar
PUBLISHED ON SEP 14, 2020 05:58 AM IST
For Black environmental scientists, worrying about whether they are likely to be harassed or asked to justify their presence while doing fieldwork is a familiar concern.
Dark matter is the invisible glue that holds stars together inside a galaxy.(REUTERS)
Dark matter is the invisible glue that holds stars together inside a galaxy.(REUTERS)

Scientists confounded by new findings on universe’s mysterious dark matter

Washington | By Reuters| Posted by Susmita Pakrasi
UPDATED ON SEP 12, 2020 10:13 AM IST
Research published this week revealed an unexpected discrepancy between observations of dark matter concentrations in three massive clusters of galaxies encompassing trillions of stars and theoretical computer simulations of how dark matter should be distributed.
Coronavirus(Unsplash)
Coronavirus(Unsplash)

Scientists develop new tool to monitor coronavirus mutations

Melbourne, Australia | By Press Trust of India | Posted by: Alfea Jamal
UPDATED ON SEP 11, 2020 06:42 PM IST
Scientists assessed the genome data of more than 1,20,000 samples of the novel coronavirus, and have developed a new tool to monitor mutations in the virus that may make it difficult to develop vaccines and drugs for COVID-19.
Healthcare workers during COVID-19 screening and swab test at Goregaon in Mumbai, India, on Tuesday, September 8, 2020.(Satyabrata Tripathy/HT Photo)
Healthcare workers during COVID-19 screening and swab test at Goregaon in Mumbai, India, on Tuesday, September 8, 2020.(Satyabrata Tripathy/HT Photo)

Covid-19 may cause prolonged gut infection, scientists say

Bloomberg | By Bloomberg | Posted by: Alfea Jamal
UPDATED ON SEP 08, 2020 08:24 PM IST
Covid-19 patients have active and prolonged gut viral infection, even in the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms, scientists found.
Presence of antibodies may not guarantee protection from COVID-19(Twitter/marylui27)
Presence of antibodies may not guarantee protection from COVID-19(Twitter/marylui27)

Indian scientists grapple with antibodies issue, say it may not guarantee protection from COVID-19

New Delhi | By Press Trust of India| Posted by Zarafshan Shiraz
UPDATED ON SEP 07, 2020 08:19 PM IST
Given that there are neutralising antibodies and also ‘simple’ antibodies, Indian scientists reveal that it may not be that useful to stop further spread of the coronavirus
The head of a mummified domestic cat revealed by X-ray micro CT scanning that generates three-dimensional images with a resolution 100 times greater than a medical CT scan.(Reuters)
The head of a mummified domestic cat revealed by X-ray micro CT scanning that generates three-dimensional images with a resolution 100 times greater than a medical CT scan.(Reuters)

Scientists digitally ‘unwrap’ mummies of cat, snake and bird

Washington | By Reuters
UPDATED ON AUG 24, 2020 05:20 PM IST
Researchers on Monday said they digitally “unwrapped” and “dissected” the three mummies using X-ray micro CT scanning, which generates three-dimensional images with a resolution 100 times greater than a medical CT scan.
An ancient Egyptian mummy of a bird of prey is seen in this undated image released on August 20, 2020. Egypt Centre, Swansea University.(via REUTERS)
An ancient Egyptian mummy of a bird of prey is seen in this undated image released on August 20, 2020. Egypt Centre, Swansea University.(via REUTERS)

Scientists peer inside ancient Egyptian cat, snake and bird mummies

Washington | By Reuters
PUBLISHED ON AUG 21, 2020 05:37 AM IST
Researchers on Monday said they digitally “unwrapped” and “dissected” the three mummies using X-ray micro CT scanning, which generates three-dimensional images with a resolution 100 times greater than a medical CT scan. Actual unwrapping can damage and dislodge structures within a mummy.
The region above northern Greenland is usually covered in thick sea ice, sometimes built up over several years. (Representational Image)(Unsplash)
The region above northern Greenland is usually covered in thick sea ice, sometimes built up over several years. (Representational Image)(Unsplash)

Scientists on Arctic mission set off on unplanned detour to North Pole

Berlin | By Associated Press | Posted by Saumya Sharma
UPDATED ON AUG 20, 2020 09:09 PM IST
The coronavirus pandemic almost caused the mission to be cut short, as travel restrictions made resupply and crew rotations difficult.
This transmission electron microscope image shows SARS-CoV-2, also known as novel coronavirus, the virus that causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient.(via REUTERS)
This transmission electron microscope image shows SARS-CoV-2, also known as novel coronavirus, the virus that causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient.(via REUTERS)

Trail of bubbles leads scientists to new coronavirus clue

New York | By Press Trust of India | Posted by: Shankhyaneel Sarkar
PUBLISHED ON AUG 20, 2020 05:28 AM IST
Dr Alexandra Reynolds, a neurologist at New York’s Mount Sinai Health System, initially was baffled as she tracked “the cacophony of sound” made by those harmless bubbles passing through the bloodstream of patient after patient.
People wearing face masks to protect against the spread of the new coronavirus walk through Chinatown in Yokohama, near Tokyo, Friday, July 24, 2020.(AP)
People wearing face masks to protect against the spread of the new coronavirus walk through Chinatown in Yokohama, near Tokyo, Friday, July 24, 2020.(AP)

Coronavirus: WHO chief scientist sees no herd immunity to Covid-19 yet

London | By Associated Press | Posted by: Alfea Jamal
UPDATED ON JUL 24, 2020 05:06 PM IST
Dr. Soumya Swaminathan estimates that about 50-60% of the population will need to be immune to the coronavirus for there to be any protective “herd immunity” effect. This is usually achieved through vaccination and occurs when most of a population is immune to a disease, blocking its continued spread.
According to the research, all people reporting symptoms experienced headache and loss of smell, with varying combinations of additional symptoms at various times. (Photo by Parwaz Khan / Hindustan Times)
According to the research, all people reporting symptoms experienced headache and loss of smell, with varying combinations of additional symptoms at various times. (Photo by Parwaz Khan / Hindustan Times)

Scientists identify six distinct clusters of Covid-19 symptoms in patients

London | By Press Trust of India| Posted by Susmita Pakrasi
PUBLISHED ON JUL 18, 2020 04:08 PM IST
The yet-to-be peer reviewed study, published in the medRxiv preprint platform, used a machine learning algorithm to analyse data from a subset of around 1,600 users in the UK and US with confirmed Covid-19, who had regularly logged their symptoms using the app in March and April.
The scientists said these miRNAs are essential for controlling the activity of genes within cells, and are also important players in the recognition and destruction of viruses.(REUTERS)
The scientists said these miRNAs are essential for controlling the activity of genes within cells, and are also important players in the recognition and destruction of viruses.(REUTERS)

Scientists identify potential drug targets in Covid-19 genome

Melbourne | By Press Trust of India| Posted by Susmita Pakrasi
PUBLISHED ON JUL 14, 2020 04:50 PM IST
According to the study, published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences, these regions on the viral genome are target sites recognised by host miRNA -- which are nucleic acid-based ‘immune system’ operating inside the body’s cells.
New Delhi, India - July 5, 2020: A girl rides a bicycle at Rajpath after rain showers in New Delhi, India, on Sunday, July 5, 2020.(Arvind Yadav/HT PHOTO)
New Delhi, India - July 5, 2020: A girl rides a bicycle at Rajpath after rain showers in New Delhi, India, on Sunday, July 5, 2020.(Arvind Yadav/HT PHOTO)

Covid-19: Hundreds of scientists say coronavirus is airborne, ask WHO to revise recommendations

Reuters | By Reuters | Posted by: Alfea Jamal
UPDATED ON JUL 06, 2020 05:26 PM IST
Hundreds of scientists say there is evidence that novel coronavirus in smaller particles in the air can infect people and are calling for the World Health Organization to revise recommendations, the New York Times reported.
Dr Andrea Crisanti poses in London, Britain September 14, 2018. Picture taken September 14, 2018.(REUTERS)
Dr Andrea Crisanti poses in London, Britain September 14, 2018. Picture taken September 14, 2018.(REUTERS)

Italy’s Cassandra: Andrea Crisanti, the scientist who challenged WHO guidelines on novel coronavirus

Rome | By Reuters| Posted by: Alfea Jamal
UPDATED ON JUN 30, 2020 01:16 PM IST
The Italian virologist has become a medical celebrity at home, a contrarian who broke with initial  World Health  Organization  (WHO) guidelines  on testing for the new coronavirus, deeming them narrow and “stupid”, something the UN agency denies.
Representational image.(Unsplash)
Representational image.(Unsplash)

Coronavirus crisis: Here’s how sleep, or lack of it, during Covid-19 pandemic is being affected

London | By Reuters | Posted by: Alfea Jamal
UPDATED ON JUN 12, 2020 02:25 PM IST
An international group of neuroscientists will examine how the world is sleeping, or failing to, during the COVID-19 pandemic, which has upended work, social and family life for countless people.
The Covid-19 pandemic has led to an urgent need for the development of a safe and effective vaccine against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes the Covid-19 disease, the researchers said.(Bloomberg)
The Covid-19 pandemic has led to an urgent need for the development of a safe and effective vaccine against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes the Covid-19 disease, the researchers said.(Bloomberg)

Targets for Covid-19 vaccine identified by scientists

New Delhi | By Press Trust of India
PUBLISHED ON JUN 09, 2020 08:25 PM IST
The researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) in the US employed the same approach used to elicit an immune response against cancer cells to stimulate an immune response against the novel coronavirus.
Mumbai, India - June 8, 2020: Health workers conducting COVID-19 coronavirus testing drive inside Dharavi slum, during a government-imposed nationwide lockdown as a preventive measure against the spread of the coronavirus in Mumbai, India, on Monday, June 8, 2020. (Photo by Satyabrata Tripathy/Hindustan Times)(Satyabrata Tripathy/HT Photo)
Mumbai, India - June 8, 2020: Health workers conducting COVID-19 coronavirus testing drive inside Dharavi slum, during a government-imposed nationwide lockdown as a preventive measure against the spread of the coronavirus in Mumbai, India, on Monday, June 8, 2020. (Photo by Satyabrata Tripathy/Hindustan Times)(Satyabrata Tripathy/HT Photo)

Unlock 1.0: Coronavirus lockdowns saved many lives and easing them is risky. Here’s how

London | By Reuters | Posted by: Alfea Jamal
UPDATED ON JUN 09, 2020 02:50 PM IST
Lockdowns imposed to curb the spread of COVID-19 have saved millions of lives and easing them now carries high risks, according to two international studies published on Monday.
SHARE
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • ...
Story Saved