First human trial of potential coronavirus antibody treatment begins: Top updates on Covid-19 vaccine

India has approved Gilead Sciences Inc’s antiviral drug remdesivir for emergency use for five doses in treating Covid-19 patients. 
Remdesivir, which is administered intravenously in hospital, is the first drug to show improvement in Covid-19 patients in formal clinical trials and is at the forefront of the battle against Covid-19, which has no approved treatment or vaccine.(Bloomberg)
Remdesivir, which is administered intravenously in hospital, is the first drug to show improvement in Covid-19 patients in formal clinical trials and is at the forefront of the battle against Covid-19, which has no approved treatment or vaccine.(Bloomberg)
Updated on Jun 03, 2020 03:57 PM IST
Copy Link
Hindustan Times, New Delhi | Byhindustantimes.com | Edited by Sparshita Saxena

As the number of coronavirus cases race beyond the 6 million-mark globally, scientists and experts are speeding up the effort to arrive at the potential vaccine for Covid-19.    

In what can be termed as nothing short of a stepping stone in India’s fight against Covid-19, New Delhi has approved Gilead Sciences Inc’s antiviral drug remdesivir for emergency use for five doses in treating Covid-19 patients. 

Here are the key developments:

• Remdesivir, which is administered intravenously in hospital, is the first drug to show improvement in Covid-19 patients in formal clinical trials and is at the forefront of the battle against Covid-19, which has no approved treatment or vaccine. The drug was granted emergency use authorization by the US Food and Drug Administration last month and has received approval by Japanese health regulators. 

• Besides the US and India, South Korea has also approved the emergency use of Gilead Sciences Inc’s remdesivir to treat Covid-19. 

 Also Watch | Covid-19: India crosses 2 lakh case mark, multiple layer masks better than single

• Earlier this week, Gilead said remdesivir showed modest benefit in patients with moderate Covid-19 given a five-day course, while those who received it for 10 days in the study did not fare as well.

• A senior US Army vaccine researcher said it was reasonable to expect that some sort of coronavirus vaccine could be available to part of the US population by the end of 2020, news agency Reuters reported. 

Also read: Another single-day jump in Covid-19 cases with 8,909 new infections; India’s tally at 2.07 lakh

• American pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly and Company announced the first human trial of its potential Covid-19 drug. According to the Indianapolis-based drug-making firm, the drug agent has been drawn from the blood sample of an early US Covid-19 patient who successfully recovered from deadly contagion. 

• Chairman of Swiss multinational chemicals and biotechnology company, Lonza, said the group aims to speed completion of two commercial production lines for Moderna Inc’s trial Covid-19 vaccine. 

• The first results from the world’s largest randomised trial of drugs to treat Covid-19 patients could be available in early July, one of the scientists leading the UK-based study called Recovery said on Tuesday.

(With inputs from Reuters)

SHARE THIS ARTICLE ON
Close Story
QUICKREADS

Less time to read?

Try Quickreads

  • Residents line up for Covid-19 testing in Shanghai, on Wednesday. Residents of parts of Shanghai and Beijing have been ordered to undergo further rounds of testing following the discovery of new cases in the two cities. (AP)

    Beijing announces first vaccine mandate as Omicron clusters break out in China

    China's capital Beijing will introduce a vaccine mandate for certain public venues from July 11, the first in the country, as millions in China face new curbs and the country tackles fresh Covid-19 clusters including a karaoke lounge-related outbreak in Shanghai and a spreading one in the tourist city of Xian. Restaurants and public transport are exempt. Those who have health problems and cannot be vaccinated are exempt from the mandate.

  • British Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks during the weekly question time debate, in Parliament in London.

    My job is to 'keep going': British PM amid wave of resignations

    British Prime Minister Boris Johnson defied growing calls for him to step down on Wednesday, telling lawmakers he would "keep going" following a wave of resignations from his government including those of two key ministers. Johnson made the remarks in parliament in response to a question from a lawmaker in his own party who asked if the prime minister thought there were any circumstances in which he should resign.

  • Kalwant Singh, who was convicted in 2016 of bringing heroin into Singapore, is scheduled to be hanged Thursday, July 7.

    Singapore to hang 2nd Indian-origin drug trafficker in 3 months, appeal fails

    An Indian-origin Malaysian drug trafficker, Kalwant Singh, is to be executed early Thursday after a Singapore court dismissed a last-minute appeal to delay his sentence. This comes two months after authorities executed another Indian-Malaysian drug trafficker - Nagaenthran Dharmalingam, 34 - whose lawyers and family appealed on grouDharmalingam, who had been on death row for over a decades he was mentally disabled. He had sought a review on grounds he had given information that helped arrest a key suspected drug trafficker.

  • In a letter to Trudeau, the group, Canadian Hindu Volunteers, said the film “deliberately shows (the) Hindu Goddess in a derogatory manner”. (Shutterstock)

    Kaali movie organisers apologise after uproar over ‘offensive’ poster

    The university responsible for curating the programme and the museum that provided it a platform issued an apology on Tuesday after uproar over a film with a poster found offensive by Hindu groups in Canada. On the other hand, York University, where the film's director is studying, has supported Leena Manimekalai's artistic freedom. A spokesperson for the university also said its logo was used on the controversial poster “without permission”.

  • Nearly 100 Sikhs had been removed from their posts for not meeting the ‘clean shave’ requirement. (REUTERS/FILE)

    ‘Clean shave’ directive: Toronto makes an exception for Sikh security guards

    The city of Toronto on Tuesday said it is making an exception to its “clean shave” directive for security personnel posted at shelters impacted by Covid-19, after nearly 100 Sikhs were removed from their posts for not meeting the requirement. Security agencies contracted by the city laid off or transferred Sikhs who refused to shave their beard for religious reasons. The matter was raised by the World Sikh Organisation.

SHARE
Story Saved
×
Saved Articles
Following
My Reads
Sign out
New Delhi 0C
Wednesday, July 06, 2022