G7 vows to keep pressure on Russia after missiles strike Ukraine shopping mall

Published on Jun 28, 2022 04:20 AM IST
More than 1,000 people were inside when two Russian missiles slammed into the mall in the city of Kremenchuk, southeast of Kyiv, Zelenskiy wrote on Telegram. At least 13 people were killed and 50 injured, Ukrainian officials said.
People watch as smoke bellows after a Russian missile strike hit a crowded shopping mall, in Kremenchuk, Ukraine.(AP)
People watch as smoke bellows after a Russian missile strike hit a crowded shopping mall, in Kremenchuk, Ukraine.(AP)
Reuters |

Russian missiles struck a crowded shopping mall in central Ukraine on Monday, President Volodymyr Zelenskiy said, as Moscow fought for control of a key eastern city and Western leaders promised to support Kyiv in the war "as long as it takes".

More than 1,000 people were inside when two Russian missiles slammed into the mall in the city of Kremenchuk, southeast of Kyiv, Zelenskiy wrote on Telegram. At least 13 people were killed and 50 injured, Ukrainian officials said. Rescuers trawled through mangled metal and debris for any survivors.

"This is not an accidental hit, this is a calculated Russian strike exactly onto this shopping centre," Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy said in an evening video address. He said the death count could rise.

Russia has not commented on the strike, which was condemned by the United Nations and Ukraine's Western allies. But its deputy ambassador to the United Nations, Dmitry Polyanskiy, accused Ukraine of using the incident to gain sympathy ahead of a June 28-30 summit of the NATO military alliance.

"One should wait for what our Ministry of Defence will say, but there are too many striking discrepancies already," Polyanskiy wrote on Twitter.

As night fell in Kremenchuk, firefighters and soldiers brought lights and generators to continue the search. Family members, some close to tears and with hands over their mouths, lined up at a hotel across the street where rescue workers had set up a base.

Kiril Zhebolovsky, 24, was looking for his friend, Ruslan, 22, who worked at the Comfy electronics store and had not been heard from since the blast.

"We sent him messages, called, but nothing," he said. He left his name and phone number with the rescue workers in case his friend is found.

U.N. spokesman Stephane Dujarric said the attack was "deplorable". Leaders of the Group of Seven major democracies, gathered for their annual summit in Germany, condemned what they called an "abominable" attack.

"We stand united with Ukraine in mourning the innocent victims of this brutal attack," they wrote in a joint statement tweeted by the German government spokesperson. "Russian President Putin and those responsible will be held to account."

Elsewhere on the battlefield, Ukraine endured another difficult day following the loss of the now-ruined city of Sievierodonetsk after weeks of bombardment and street fighting.

Russian artillery was pounding Lysychansk, its twin across the Siverskyi Donets River. Lysychansk is the last big city still held by Ukraine in the eastern Luhansk province, a main target for the Kremlin after Russian troops failed to take the capital Kyiv early in the war.

A Russian missile strike killed eight and wounded 21 others in Lysychansk on Monday, the area's regional governor Serhiy Gaidai said. There was no immediate Russian comment.

Ukraine's military said Russia's forces were trying to cut off Lysychansk from the south. Reuters could not confirm Russian reports that Moscow's troops had already entered the city.

'AS LONG AS IT TAKES'

Russia invaded Ukraine on Feb. 24 in what the Kremlin calls a "special military operation" to rid the country of far-right nationalists and ensure Russian security. The war has killed thousands, sent millions fleeing and laid waste to cities.

During their summit in Germany, G7 leaders, including U.S. President Joe Biden, said they would keep sanctions on Russia for as long as necessary and intensify international pressure on President Vladimir Putin's government and its ally Belarus.

"Imagine if we allowed Putin to get away with the violent acquisition of huge chunks of another country, sovereign, independent territory," British Prime Minister Boris Johnson told the BBC.

The United States said it was finalising another weapons package for Ukraine that would include long-range air-defence systems - arms that Zelenskiy specifically requested when he addressed the leaders by video link on Monday.

In his address to the G7 leaders, Zelenskiy asked again for more arms, U.S. and European officials said. He requested help to export grain from Ukraine and for more sanctions on Russia.

The G7 nations promised to squeeze Russia's finances further - including a deal to cap the price of Russian oil that a U.S. official said was "close" - and promised up to $29.5 billion more for Ukraine.

"We will continue to provide financial, humanitarian, military and diplomatic support and stand with Ukraine for as long as it takes," a G7 statement said.

The White House said Russia had defaulted on its external debt for the first time in more than a century as sweeping sanctions have effectively cut the country off from the global financial system.

Russia rejected the claims, telling investors to go to Western financial agents for the cash which was sent but bondholders did not receive.

The war has created difficulties for countries way beyond Europe's borders, with disruptions to food and energy exports hitting the global economy.

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