New study suggests Down’s Syndrome can be ‘treated’ with green tea | health and fitness | Hindustan Times
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New study suggests Down’s Syndrome can be ‘treated’ with green tea

Brain scans revealed that the compound, called epigallocatechin gallate, altered the way neurons in the brain connect with one another.

health and fitness Updated: Jun 07, 2016 10:14 IST
AFP
In a year-long clinical trial, the treatment led to improved scores on memory and behaviour tests, they reported in a study, published in the The Lancet Neurology. The positive impact remained six months after the trial ended.
In a year-long clinical trial, the treatment led to improved scores on memory and behaviour tests, they reported in a study, published in the The Lancet Neurology. The positive impact remained six months after the trial ended.(Shutterstock)

Miracle herb, green tea is known for its many benefits and scientists have now discovered something more about it. A chemical in the tea has been shown to improve cognitive ability in persons with Down’s syndrome, scientists and doctors said on Tuesday.

Read: Green tea helps you fight arthritis and joint pain, says study

In a year-long clinical trial, the treatment led to improved scores on memory and behaviour tests, they reported in a study, published in the The Lancet Neurology. The positive impact remained six months after the trial ended.

Brain scans revealed that the compound, called epigallocatechin gallate, altered the way neurons in the brain connect with one another.

While significant, the results should not be interpreted as a “cure” but a tool to improve the quality of life for people with Down Syndrome. (Shutterstock)

“This is the first time that a treatment has shown efficacy in the cognitive improvement of persons with this syndrome,” said Mara Dierssen, senior author of the study and a researcher at the Centre for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona.

Read: 12 benefits of green tea we bet you didn’t know!

While significant, the results should not be interpreted as a “cure”. “But it may be a tool to improve these individuals’ quality of life,” she said in a statement.

Experts not involved in the study described it as “exciting” and “an important piece of work.”

At the same time, they cautioned, the findings must be validated in additional trials.

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