11-year-old Hyderabad boy Agastya Jaiswal clears Class 12, aims to be a doctor | india-news | Hindustan Times
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11-year-old Hyderabad boy Agastya Jaiswal clears Class 12, aims to be a doctor

Agastya Jaiswal cleared his intermediate examination on Sunday, becoming the youngest boy in Telangana to pass the examination at 11.

india Updated: Apr 17, 2017 19:13 IST
Srinivasa Rao Apparasu
Agastya Jaiswal passes his intermediate examination at 11. His sister Naina did it at 10.
Agastya Jaiswal passes his intermediate examination at 11. His sister Naina did it at 10.(HT photo)

What were you doing when you were 11?

Hyderabad’s Agastya Jaiswal is done with junior college. On Sunday, he became the youngest boy in Telangana to pass the intermediate examination, or Class 12.

A student of St Mary’s Junior College at Yousufguda, the 11-year-old scored 63% marks, with commerce, economics and civics as his main subjects.

“I want to do my graduation in commerce in the next three years but my ultimate goal is to be a doctor,” Agastya told HT hours after the result was announced.

A commerce graduate and a doctor? Well, Agastya has a plan.

After he completes BCom, he will repeat intermediate.

“...but with biology, physics and chemistry. I will then write medical entrance exam and get a seat in an MBBS course,” he said.

Agastya needs to be back in junior college also because he has to be at least 17, the average age at which a student passes Class 12, to sit the test to get into a medical college.

And, he doesn’t want to waste time.

“I don’t want to sit idle and want to go ahead with BCom,” said Agastya, who was all of eight when he passed Class 10. He took a “gap year” before enrolling for intermediate.

Aren’t economics and commerce difficult to understand? “I don’t mug up topics, but understand them and write answers,” he said in a matter-of-fact tone, adding his parents trained him well to understand the subjects. He also thanked his lecturers for helping him.

Starting young seems to be a family trait.

At 17, his sister, Naina, has enrolled for PhD.

Naina, who played international table tennis at sub-junior level, was the first girl from Asia to pass Class 10 at eight and intermediate at 10. “I achieved the feat a year earlier than my brother,” she said.

Two years after she became the youngest journalism graduate in the country at 13, Naina got her master’s degree in political science from Osmania University.

She has chosen Adi Kavi Nannayya University in Rajahmundry, Andhra Pradesh for her PhD. Vice chancellor M Muthyala Naidu will guide her in her thesis on sports management, with emphasis on table tennis. “I will be joining the course next month,” Naina said.

Their father, Ashwani Kumar, is a practicing advocate and is happy with the way his children have raced through school and college. “They are born talented. I only identified their talent and encouraged them,” he said.