Full text of Supreme Court’s judgment on Right to Privacy | india-news | Hindustan Times
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Full text of Supreme Court’s judgment on Right to Privacy

The Supreme Court on Thursday unanimously declared right to privacy as a “guaranteed fundamental right”. Excerpts of the key conclusions by the top court.

india Updated: Aug 24, 2017 14:24 IST
HT Correspondent
In a landmark ruling, the Supreme Court on Thursday said Indians have a constitutional right to privacy
In a landmark ruling, the Supreme Court on Thursday said Indians have a constitutional right to privacy(HT File Photo)

In a landmark decision that will affect the lives of all Indians, the Supreme Court on Thursday unanimously declared that individual privacy is a “guaranteed fundamental right”.

The verdict by a nine-judge Constitution bench could now test the validity of Aadhaar, the controversial biometric identification project the government has been pushing but critics have opposed as intrusive. (LIVE updates)

The judgment may also have a bearing on broader civil rights as well as a law criminalising homosexuality. A ban imposed on the consumption of beef in many states and alcohol in some could also come up for review.

Issuing the ruling, the bench said right to privacy was at par with right to life and liberty, and that the verdict will protect citizens’ personal freedom from intrusions by the state.

The bench, headed by chief justice JS Khehar, comprises justices J Chelameswar, SA Bobde, RK Agrawal, RF Nariman, AM Sapre, DY Chandrachud, SK Kaul and S Abdul Nazeer.

Key conclusions from the judgment:

1. Life and personal liberty are inalienable rights. These are rights which are inseparable from a dignified human existence. The dignity of the individual, equality between human beings and the quest for liberty are the foundational pillars of the Indian Constitution;

2. Judicial recognition of the existence of a constitutional right of privacy is not an exercise in the nature of amending the Constitution nor is the Court embarking on a constitutional function of that nature which is entrusted to Parliament;

3. Privacy includes at its core the preservation of personal intimacies, the sanctity of family life, marriage, procreation, the home and sexual orientation. Privacy also connotes a right to be left alone.

4. Personal choices governing a way of life are intrinsic to privacy.

5. ...privacy is not lost or surrendered merely because the individual is in a public place. Privacy attaches to the person since it is an essential facet of the dignity of the human being;

6. Technological change has given rise to concerns which were not present seven decades ago and the rapid growth of technology may render obsolescent many notions of the present. Hence the interpretation of the Constitution must be resilient and flexible to allow future generations to adapt its content bearing in mind its basic or essential features;

7. Like other rights which form part of the fundamental freedoms protected by Part III, including the right to life and personal liberty under Article 21, privacy is not an absolute right. A law which encroaches upon privacy will have to withstand the touchstone of permissible restrictions on fundamental rights.

8. Privacy has both positive and negative content. The negative content restrains the state from committing an intrusion upon the life and personal liberty of a citizen. Its positive content imposes an obligation on the state to take all necessary measures to protect the privacy of the individual.

9. The right of privacy is a fundamental right. It is a right which protects the inner sphere of the individual from interference from both State, and non-State actors and allows the individuals to make autonomous life choices.

10. The privacy of the home must protect the family, marriage, procreation and sexual orientation which are all important aspects of dignity.

11. ...in a country like ours which prides itself on its diversity, privacy is one of the most important rights to be protected both against State and non-State actors and be recognized as a fundamental right.

12. ...right of privacy cannot be denied, even if there is a miniscule fraction of the population which is affected. The majoritarian concept does not apply to Constitutional rights...

13. Let the right of privacy, an inherent right, be unequivocally a fundamental right embedded in part-III of the Constitution of India, but subject to the restrictions specified, relatable to that part. This is the call of today. The old order changeth yielding place to new.

Below is the full text of the unanimous judgement: