Today in New Delhi, India
Nov 15, 2018-Thursday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

In Pics: The World Press Photo awards 2016

Award-winning photos from The World Press Photo Foundation’s 2016 collection are now on display in Delhi.

art and culture Updated: Apr 03, 2017 13:14 IST
Aparna Alluri
Aparna Alluri
Hindustan Times
Photojournalism,Warren Richardson,Kevin Frayer
Brent Stirton’s award-winning series for National Geographic on the illegal ivory trade in Chad, Africa, on view at a gallery in Delhi. The series is part of the World Press Photo Foundation’s award-winning photojournalism being exhibited in the capital. (Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)

Timeless. Haunting. Incredibly powerful. Those are some of the words jury members used to describe Warren Richardson’s swift, clandestine shot of a man handing a baby through barbed wire over the Serbia-Hungary border. The image won the 2016 World Press Photo of the Year and first prize in the awards’ Spot News Category as well.

Richardson’s photo is part of an exhibition of award-winning photojournalism on display in Delhi until Monday. The World Press Photo Foundation’s annual contest honours the best across the world: 42 photographers from 21 countries won the 2016 awards.

From heartbreaking portraits of missing Syrians refugees to a bleak Pyongyang skyline; from vividly intimate shots of chameleons to documenting rape in the US Army, the photos are both visceral and profound. This is a mere peek into a rich collection that spans both the globe and the breadth of reportage.

(Warren Richardson, Australia — Hope for a New Life)

A baby is handed through a hole in a razor wire barrier to a Syrian refugee who has already managed to cross the border from Serbia into Hungary. The photo — shot around 3 am on August 28, 2015 — was taken in moonlight, without a flash, because that would alert the police. By then, Richardson had been waiting with a group of Syrian refugees for nearly five hours. “I was exhausted by the time I took the picture,” he said in his winner’s statement.

(Kevin Frayer, Canada, Getty Images — China’s Coal Addiction)

Chinese men pull a tricycle in a neighbourhood next to a coal-fired power plant in Shanxi, China, in November 2015. The province in North China is a leading producer of the country’s coal — annual production crosses 300 million tonnes.

(David Guttenfelder, USA, for The Associated Press / National Geographic / The New York Times — North Korea: Life in the Cult of Kim)

The skyline of central Pyongyang, North Korea, at dusk on April 12, 2011. The photographer was granted access to a country where local media are strictly regulated and foreign media are rarely allowed inside. He visited North Korea some 40 times between 2008 and 2015.

(Daniel Berehulak, Australia, for The New York Times — An Earthquake’s Aftermath, Nepal)

Residents forage through their destroyed homes, gathering salvageable belongings in Bhaktapur, Nepal, in April 2015. On April 25, a magnitude 7.8 earthquake struck Kathmandu, followed by a series of aftershocks, that left more than 8,000 dead and over 21,000 injured.

(Dario Mitidieri, Italy, for CAFOD — Lost Family Portraits)

A Syrian family in a refugee camp in the Beqaa Valley, Lebanon, on December 15, 2015. The chair represents a missing family member. According to UNHCR, by the end of 2015, more than 370,000 Syrian refugees were living in camps in the Beqaa Valley, close to the Syrian border.

(Tim Laman, USA, for National Geographic — Tough Times for Orangutans)

Orphaned baby orangutans get a ride from their night cages to a patch of forest where they can play for a day, at the International Animal Rescue facility in Ketapang, Borneo. Orangutans are found in the wild only in the rainforests of Sumatra and Borneo. Sumatran orangutans are listed as a ‘critically endangered’ species, with around 7,000 living out of captivity.

What: World Press Photo Exhibition Delhi

When: 11 am to 7 pm, Until April 3

Where: India International Centre, 40, Max Mueller Marg, Lodhi Estate

Nearest metro station: JLN Stadium

Entry is free.

First Published: Apr 01, 2017 16:23 IST