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Home / Art and Culture / Nature of Khayal

Nature of Khayal

Indian classical music’s rules are not constrictive like the Taliban’s, says sitarist Shujaat Hussain Khan. “Many of its forms such as Dhrupad are serious and spiritual, but it has other redeeming qualities.”

art-and-culture Updated: Apr 02, 2010, 21:53 IST
Malvika Nanda
Malvika Nanda
Hindustan Times

Indian classical music’s rules are not constrictive like the Taliban’s, says sitarist Shujaat Hussain Khan. “Many of its forms such as Dhrupad are serious and spiritual, but it has other redeeming qualities.”

The Grammy-nominated musician feels that the genre is benefiting from the fact that the line between purists and semi-purists is getting blurred. That perhaps explains Khan’s urge to experiment in his concerts.

Nehru Park will come alive this evening with Khan’s sitar strains and soothing Dhrupad vocals by legendary ustad Fahimuddin
Dagar. Hearing the Dhrupad exponent, whose rich lineage dates back to the 18th Century, is an experience to cherish by itself.

While the evening has a strong classical base as the main course, Khan promises a light classical piece or two as dessert.

“I want people to let go of their fears about classical music being serious… there are so many other aspects to it. Khayal, which is what I play, combines sensuality, drama, and even anger.”

The concert begins at 6 pm, Nehru Park, Chanakyapuri. Entry free, seating on first come first serve basis.

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