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Home / Chandigarh / Trials end successfully, but PGIMER to continue taking plasma donations

Trials end successfully, but PGIMER to continue taking plasma donations

The trial took place across 50 sites in India with the sample size of 425 patients, and the results are likely to be announced soon.

chandigarh Updated: Jul 14, 2020 00:32 IST
Amanjeet Singh Salyal
Amanjeet Singh Salyal
Hindustan Times, Chandigarh
The therapy works when the plasma containing antibodies is administered into critically-ill patients.
The therapy works when the plasma containing antibodies is administered into critically-ill patients. (HT FILE)

The convalescent plasma therapy (CPT) being conducted for Covid-19 patients at the Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research has borne promising results, the doctors have said.

Professor Pankaj Malhotra from the department of internal medicine said that five patients who were administered plasma have shown no side effects and there have been no associated complications during the treatment. “The results of the trial have been positive and encouraging”, he said.

The Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) had selected PGIMER as one of the centres for a national-level trial of the CPT.

However, ICMR asked the institute to stop the trial after PGIMER successfully enrolled nine patients, of whom five received the treatment and the remaining were on the control arm.

The institute in earlier communications had said that in some cases it had been observed that when out on CPT, the patient would be taken off oxygen in just three days and gradually their condition would improve with the help of supportive care.

RESULTS TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON

The trial took place across 50 sites in India with the sample size of 425 patients, and the results are likely to be announced soon.

Meanwhile, PGIMER has decided to go ahead with taking plasma donations with the consent of the donors. “We will continue taking plasma from eligible donors as the Drug Control Agency has allowed us off-label use of the convalescent plasma. If any patient falls in the category where plasma can be given to stop the worsening of conditions, we may administer it with their consent,” said professor Ratti Ram Sharma, head of the department of transfusion medicine, PGIMER.

The plasma is taken from patients who have recovered from Covid. The therapy works when the plasma containing antibodies is administered into critically ill patients. The donor should have had a prior diagnosis of Covid-19 with symptoms like fever and cough, and should have completely recovered with no symptoms for at least 28 days prior to donation.

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