Ludhiana | ‘Animal-to-human transmission of lumpy skin disease is a myth’

Published on Aug 12, 2022 10:06 PM IST

Guru Angad Dev Veterinary and Animal Sciences University (GADVASU), Ludhiana, held an online panel discussion on lumpy skin disease on Friday

Dr RK Sharma, head, department of veterinary and animal husbandry extension, GADVASU, Ludhiana, acquainted participants with indigenous methodologies to enhance the immunity of animals, treat lumpy skin disease and prevent vector attack. (HT FILE)
Dr RK Sharma, head, department of veterinary and animal husbandry extension, GADVASU, Ludhiana, acquainted participants with indigenous methodologies to enhance the immunity of animals, treat lumpy skin disease and prevent vector attack. (HT FILE)
By, Ludhiana

The transmission of lumpy skin disease (LSD) from animals to humans through milk is a myth, experts from Guru Angad Dev Veterinary and Animal Sciences University (GADVASU) said, during an online panel discussion on LSD on Friday.

The discussion was organised for farmers and other stakeholders to bust various myths related to the disease.

Dr Parkash Singh Brar, director extension education, said the university was getting over a hundred calls daily about LSD and people were scared by some myths about its transmission through milk and vaccination.

Dr Swarn Singh Randhawa, director, Veterinary Hospital, GADVASU, said, “ The disease is cattle and buffalo specific and occurs in hot and humid environment. It is spreads by vectors such as mosquitoes, flies and ticks and its symptoms include fever and nodular on the body.”

Dr Jasbir Singh Bedi, director, Centre for One Health, shattered the myths by revealing that this disease neither spreads to humans through direct contact nor through drinking the milk of affected animals. He highlighted that milk should be boiled before consumption. Further, he said carcasses of affected animals should be disposed of through incineration or buried in a 6 x 6 x 6 pit with lime.

Dr Deepti Narang, head, department of veterinary microbiology revealed that vaccination of all healthy animals above four months of age is a viable method to control the disease.

Dr RK Sharma, head, department of veterinary and animal husbandry extension, acquainted participants with indigenous methodologies to enhance the immunity of animals, treat the disease and prevent vector attack.

Sandeep Singh Randhawa, a progressive dairy farmer, Maninderjit Singh Bawa, dairy farmer-cum-environmentalist, and Surinder Singh Dhindsa , progressive dairy farmer-cum-social activist also joined the panel and gave their valuable inputs.

Over 160 participants comprising farmers, veterinary officers, extension workers, subject matter specialists from Punjab, Jammu, USA and adjoining states joined the discussion, which lasted for more than three hours.

Dr Brar said farmers could contact the university on any working day on the tele-advisory numbers 62832-97919 and 62832-58834.

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