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Thursday, Sep 19, 2019

Conduct hands-on training on stimulators rather than patients, say medical experts in Pune

World healthcare simulation week will be observed in the city from September 16 to 20

pune Updated: Sep 14, 2019 16:34 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times, Pune
City experts have stressed on the importance of conducting hands-on training on simulators rather than patients.
City experts have stressed on the importance of conducting hands-on training on simulators rather than patients.(REPRESENTATION PHOTO)
         

City experts have stressed on the importance of conducting hands-on training on simulators rather than patients ahead of the world healthcare simulation week which will be observed from September 16 to 20 for the first time in the city.

Various events will be organised during the week including awareness workshops for students, nurses, technicians among others. Interaction with guest faculties and regulatory bodies like nursing and medical councils of the country will also be organised during the event.

Dr Rajiv Yeravdekar, dean of Symbiosis Institute of Health Sciences and former member of Medical Council of India (MCI), said, “Before the Medical Council of India was dissolved, it had notified all the medical colleges and made it mandatory to have simulation laboratories so that medical practitioners could have hands-on training experience before joining any hospital or starting practice.”

He pointed out that patients should not be used as guinea pigs every time a trainee doctor wants to practise. Therefore, in order not to risk patients’ lives, the medical fraternity has come up with this technology which allows students to learn in an error-free environment.

This technology is so advanced that simulators can talk and even respond to the situation, he said, observing that medical students can gain real-life experience of handling any surgery or an emergency through these mannequins which mimic live patients.

Similar views were expressed by Dr Kapil Zirpe, national president of Indian Society for Critical Care Medicine.

On another front, the government-run Sassoon Hospital also plans to introduce a simulator laboratory said Dr TP Lahane, director of medical education and research (DMER).

“This simulator laboratory for medical students will be opened in two months,” he said.

First Published: Sep 13, 2019 18:52 IST