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Home / Cities / Pesticides at dumping yard a health hazard: Uran residents

Pesticides at dumping yard a health hazard: Uran residents

cities Updated: Feb 14, 2020 01:07 IST
Hindustantimes

More than 3,000 residents living near Bori Pakhadi dump yard at Uran have been facing problems as pesticides are being sprayed in the dump yard.

People have been complaining about breathing problems, headache, nausea, allergy and skin irritation.

“Uran Municipal Council (UMC) has started spraying pesticides in the dumping ground which is more dangerous as we can feel the chemical stench in the air. This is affecting our health,” said Samir Ashrit, 37, a resident of the area who has been raising the dump yard issue for the past 13 years.

Residents and activists have been demanding the closure of the dump yard but UMC has not taken any decision yet.

Awdhut Tawde, chief executive officer, Uran said, “We have two alternative sites which might get operational in next four to five months.”

“The district collector has directed to spray pesticide to prevent outbreak of any disease. We have tried to shift the dumping ground out of Uran but only after permissions land acquisition will happen,” said Tawde.

Uran generates 10 tonnes of waste daily. Five tonnes are wet waste (kitchen, organic and horticultural waste) and the rest is dry. Around three tonnes of wet waste are treated at source at a waste-to-energy plant at the municipal council office.

NGOs like Natconnect Foundation and Shree Ekvira Aai Pratisthan too have taken efforts to raise the issue and write mails to the officials. “It is shocking that the administration has so far not taken any action to check the dumping despite orders from the high court appointed mangrove committee and find alternative place for garbage,” said Nandakumar Pawar, head of NGO Shri Ekvira Aai Pratishtan (SEAP).