Earth Hour: Lights out for an hour to save energy. Here's all you need to know

Updated on Mar 27, 2021 11:35 AM IST

The world’s largest grassroots movement for the environment has become a catalyst for dramatic change and collective action.

Lights at India Gate in New Delhi turned off to observe Earth Hour in 2019.(ANI Photo)
Lights at India Gate in New Delhi turned off to observe Earth Hour in 2019.(ANI Photo)
By | Edited by Deepali Sharma, Hindustan Times, New Delhi

Every year. millions of people from more than 180 countries engage in a practice of switching off their lights on the last Saturday of March to show their support to the conservation of energy to save the planet.

The symbolic lights-out Earth Hour began in 2007 in Sydney by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and its partners. The world’s largest grassroots movement for the environment has become a catalyst for dramatic change and collective action.

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BSES, which is one of the major power cooperation in Delhi, has urged the citizens to observe Earth Hour on March 27 and switch off all non-essential lights and electronic appliances to conserve energy and take action against climate change. The company has urged the consumers in Delhi to switch off the lights for an hour from 8:30pm to 9:30pm on Saturday.

“We sincerely appeal to our over 4.5 million consumers and around 18 million residents in our area to make the right choice for the planet and for the future generations that will inherit it. This Earth Hour, 'switch-off and speak for nature'. Citizens can help protect the natural world to safeguard our future,” PTI quoted BSES spokesperson as saying on the significance of participating in the international movement.

People can take part in many other virtual events as well. Click here to track the events organised on the occasion near you.

Last year, the movement was bigger than ever as more than 190 countries and territories took part and observed an hour of conservation, with 4.7 billion global social media impressions, and related hashtags trending in 37 countries, as per the Earth Hour’s last year report.

In 2021, the aim is to bring world leaders together in key global conferences and forums for environmental policy-making for the next decade and beyond. WWF believes Earth Hour 2021 could be the spotlight moment that will put nature at the centre of international conversations to take urgent actions for the reversal of nature’s loss.

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