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Wednesday, Nov 20, 2019

Injured tiger given tranquilliser dies ‘due to heat stroke’ in Rajasthan

While some forest officials attributed ST-16’s death to a heat stroke, others said administering the tranquilliser in the afternoon heat may have proved fatal.

india Updated: Jun 08, 2019 23:20 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times, Jaipur
The post-mortem examination has, however, been put off till experts from the National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) and the Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly, arrive on Sunday.
The post-mortem examination has, however, been put off till experts from the National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) and the Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly, arrive on Sunday.(HT File Photo )
         

A tiger with an injury in its right leg died in Rajasthan’s Sariska Tiger Reserve on Saturday evening, hours after it was administered a tranquilliser by a team of doctors treating it, forest department officials aware of the matter said.

Conflicting reasons are being given for the death of the seven-year-old tiger that was relocated from Ranthambore National Park in April this year to correct the skewed sex ratio at Sariska, which has three male and eight female tigers. It passed away on Saturday evening while it was unconscious.

While some forest officials attributed ST-16’s death to a heat stroke, others said administering the tranquilliser in the afternoon heat may have proved fatal.

The post-mortem examination has, however, been put off till experts from the National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) and the Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly, arrive on Sunday.

Anil Jain, a member of the Sariska Tiger Reserve advisory board, said it appeared the tiger was given a high dose of tranquillisers in the afternoon when it was very hot, which may have led to his death.

He said the animal should preferably have been tranquillised in the morning or in the evening, when it would have been cooler.

Sariska divisional forest officer Seduram Yadav, however, maintained that ST-16 had died of a heat stroke.

Jain said since the tiger had been limping for a month, Dr Arvind Mathur had been called in from Jaipur on Friday to treat its injured leg.

News of its death led to a flurry among forest officials on Saturday, with principal chief conservator of forests, Arindam Tomar, rushing to Sariska.

However, Alwar collector Indrajit Singh put off the post-mortem examination, saying it would be done in the presence of experts who had been called in from NTCA and the Bareilly institute, so they could investigate and ascertain the cause of death.