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Home / India News / Allahabad HC to hear case on hoardings identifying ‘violent’ anti-CAA protesters in UP

Allahabad HC to hear case on hoardings identifying ‘violent’ anti-CAA protesters in UP

Taking cognizance of the Lucknow administration’s move, the HC bench, headed by chief justice Govind Mathur, decided to hear the case on Sunday (March 8).

india Updated: Mar 08, 2020 08:53 IST
Jitendra Sarin
Jitendra Sarin
Hindustan Times, Prayagraj
Lucknow administration put up hoardings with photographs, names, and addresses of 57 people who have been issued recovery notice for their alleged involvement in violence during Anti CAA protest in Lucknow on Friday.
Lucknow administration put up hoardings with photographs, names, and addresses of 57 people who have been issued recovery notice for their alleged involvement in violence during Anti CAA protest in Lucknow on Friday. (ANI photo)

The Allahabad high court has taken suo moto cognizance of the Lucknow administration’s move of putting up hoardings with pictures of those accused of violence during the anti-CAA protest in December last year. Taking cognizance of the Lucknow administration’s move, the HC bench, headed by chief justice Govind Mathur, decided to hear the case on Sunday (March 8).

District magistrate and divisional police commissioner of Lucknow were asked by the court to inform it about the law under which such posters/hoardings were put up on the streets of Lucknow.

The police have put up several hoardings across Lucknow identifying those accused of violence during the protests against the Citizenship (Amendment) Act in December last year. The names, photographs and residential addresses of the accused are listed on the hoardings, sparking fear among those named on the hoardings.

The accused have also been asked to pay for the damages to public and private property within a stipulated time, or have their properties attached by the district administration.

The move attracted strong reactions from protestors, ordinary citizens, politicians, legal experts and social activists, who slammed the idea of public shaming although some voices were in favour of the administration.

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