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Buchanan to quit after World Cup

"I'm contracted to the end of World Cup. I'd have thought that will be a good time to end," he said.

india Updated: Feb 05, 2006 18:27 IST

Australian coach John Buchanan will quit after next year's World Cup in West Indies, bidding adieu to a team which, under him, became one of the most successful Test and one-day side in the history of cricket.

"That's what Cricket Australia and I have agreed to at this point," he told The Age.

"If Cricket Australia felt as though I was still needed, I'd consider that. But basically I'm contracted to the end of the World Cup. I'd have thought that will be a good time to end," he added.

Buchanan, who took over the coach's mantle from the immensly successful Geoff Marsh after the World Cup in 1999, guided the Aussies to a comfortable title defence in 2003. He said his departure after the 2007 mega event would give ample time to Cricket Australia to look for his replacement.

"There will be a small break after the World Cup and that will be a reasonably appropriate time to hand over the mantle."

"We should be in reasonable shape. I'm sure we will be, whether we've won a World Cup or not," he said.

Unhappy at the media's projection of coaches being of little help to teams, Buchanan said such comments were a result of the ignorance about a coach's job.

"From certain sections of the media, past players and commentators, I think there's a total lack of understanding of what the coach does," he said.

"A lot of their comments I tend not to worry about because they are comments coming from ignorance."

He said cricket still needs coaches to nurture talents and added that the coach is an equivalent to the head of a family.

"I don't think anybody disputes the fact we need good coaching. Once somebody's game is shaped, there are lots of other things to deal with."

"It's like running a family, just being the father of a family," he said.

"We work and play together so we do operate more like a family. There is a need to have someone in a role looking after that, or assisting in that, to give some constancy in what is a bit of a dream-land, a fantasy-land existence. The major frustration can be that people don't understand it, so they don't value the role," he asserted.