Taking care of Haj | india | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Aug 15, 2018-Wednesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Taking care of Haj

This refers to the editorial It was not fate alone (Jan. 14) and Firoz Ahmed?s Mecca mayhem (Jan. 16). It is not correct to say that Saudi authorities have resorted to tokenism instead of investing in providing Haj pilgrims greater safety.

india Updated: Jan 19, 2006 00:24 IST
None

This refers to the editorial It was not fate alone (Jan. 14) and Firoz Ahmed’s Mecca mayhem (Jan. 16). It is not correct to say that Saudi authorities have resorted to tokenism instead of investing in providing Haj pilgrims greater safety. Every accident during the Haj is studied and changes made as per recommendations.

But there are factors beyond the control of authorities. The most difficult task has been to ensure compliance to regulations by pilgrims from different regions. Almost 100 billion riyals have been spent in recent years for large-scale improvements in the premises of the Two Holy Mosques. No expense is too high and no effort too great for the service of Islam’s holy places and pilgrims.

Saleh Mohd, Al-Ghamdi Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia, Delhi

Heading for trouble

The Iran crisis seems to be snowballing into a confrontation with a high risk of war. If confrontation finally takes place, it will be a major catastrophe, with oil prices skyrocketing. Though no member of the Security Council is likely to risk military confrontation, all diplomatic efforts should be made to defuse the tension.

Navneet Dhawan, Delhi

Playing on Kashmir

Why does A.G. Noorani press India every time to concede to Pakistan, something on Kashmir (The iceman goeth? January 18). Does he think that we are incapable of facing Pakistan’s proxy war? Pakistan has made three attempts to wrest Kashmir and unleashed a terror war. Indian forces either arrest or kill a militant almost every day. Why is India asked to crawl and concede something to Pakistan?

Pran Razdan, via e-mail

Cut off the supply

The use of residential units for commercial purposes compromises the privacy, security and peace of residents (Extra room, extra inch, extra dig, January 17). Can these illegal shops operate without basic services like power, telephone and water?

No. Hence, if we are really serious about reducing the commercialisation of residential properties, such infrastructure should be withdrawn immediately. Those who provide these facilities should also be taken to task.

Lokesh K. Batra, Noida

First Published: Jan 19, 2006 00:24 IST