Eid ul Adha 2024 traditions: Know all about Bakrid rituals, meaning and spiritual significance of sacrifice - Hindustan Times
close_game
close_game

Eid ul Adha 2024 traditions: Know all about Bakrid rituals, meaning and spiritual significance of sacrifice

ByZarafshan Shiraz, New Delhi
Jun 15, 2024 09:13 PM IST

Eid ul Adha 2024 traditions explained: Here's all you need to know about the rituals performed on Bakrid, their meaning and spiritual significance of sacrifice

Beyond the festive glamour, faith, henna-clad hands, shopping, moral values, dapper ethnic wear and spirit of universal brotherhood - Eid-ul-Adha or Bakrid is also known as the Festival of Sacrifice where Muslims worldwide commemorate the profound act of sacrifice by Prophet Ibrahim (Abraham) AS and his willingness to offer his son as an act of obedience to Allah (God). Bakrid is the second most important Islamic festival for Muslims and the traditions associated with Eid-ul-Adha hold deep meaning and significance, emphasising the values of faith, selflessness and gratitude.

On the occasion of the upcoming Bakri Eid ( 17 June) , people from the Muslim community are seen at the goat market to buy goats, in Thane, Mumbai, India. Eid ul Adha 2024 traditions: Know all about Bakrid rituals, meaning and spiritual significance of sacrifice (Praful Gangurde / HT Photo)
On the occasion of the upcoming Bakri Eid ( 17 June) , people from the Muslim community are seen at the goat market to buy goats, in Thane, Mumbai, India. Eid ul Adha 2024 traditions: Know all about Bakrid rituals, meaning and spiritual significance of sacrifice (Praful Gangurde / HT Photo)

Eid-ul-Adha traditions:

The traditions associated with Eid-ul-Adha emphasise the values of sacrifice, selflessness, gratitude and compassion for others. By participating in the rituals and embodying these values, Muslims not only strengthen their connection with Allah but also foster unity, generosity and empathy within their communities hence, Eid-ul-Adha is a time of celebration, reflection and a renewed commitment to living a life of faith and service to others.

Here are the traditions of Eid-ul-Adha that are universal for all Muslims worldwide -

  1. The central ritual of Eid-ul-Adha involves the sacrifice of an animal, typically a sheep, goat, cow or camel. This act symbolises Prophet Ibrahim's willingness to sacrifice his beloved son and serves as a reminder of the importance of selflessness and obedience in the face of adversity.
  2. The meat from the sacrificed animal is divided into three parts: one for the family, one for relatives and friends and one for the less fortunate, ensuring that the act of sacrifice extends beyond the individual or family to benefit the wider community.
  3. On the day of Eid-ul-Adha, Muslims gather at mosques or open prayer grounds to perform a special congregational prayer known as the Eid prayer. The prayer is led by an imam and includes specific supplications, praising Allah for His blessings and acknowledging the significance of Prophet Ibrahim's sacrifice. Imams often deliver sermons that highlight the lessons of sacrifice, emphasising the importance of obedience to God and compassion for others.
  4. Eid-ul-Adha is a time of joy and celebration, bringing families and communities together where people dress in their finest attire and exchange warm greetings of "Eid Mubarak" (Blessed Eid).
  5. Families engage in acts of charity, giving gifts and sharing meals as it is a time for forgiveness, reconciliation and strengthening bonds with loved ones.
  6. Many Muslims also visit the graves of their departed loved ones, offering prayers and seeking blessings for the deceased.

Eid-ul-Adha emphasises the spirit of generosity and charity where Muslims are encouraged to extend their support to those in need by providing food, clothing or financial assistance while the act of sharing the sacrificial meat with the less fortunate fosters a sense of compassion and solidarity, reminding individuals of their responsibility to care for the vulnerable members of society.

Meaning and significance of sacrifice:

The origins of Eid-ul-Adha can be traced back to the story of Prophet Ibrahim, who received a divine command to sacrifice his son as a test of his devotion to Allah. As Ibrahim prepared to carry out the sacrifice, Allah intervened and replaced his son with a ram, signifying that his willingness to submit to Allah's command was sufficient.

This act of sacrifice exemplifies unwavering faith, trust and obedience to God. On Eid-ul-Adha, the act of sacrifice holds profound meaning and significance for Muslims. It symbolises and commemorates the ultimate act of devotion and obedience to Allah (God) demonstrated by the Prophet Ibrahim (Abraham).

  • Obedience to Allah: The story of Prophet Ibrahim's willingness to sacrifice his beloved son as commanded by Allah exemplifies the importance of complete submission and obedience to God's will. The act of sacrifice on Eid-ul-Adha serves as a reminder for Muslims to prioritise their faith and trust in Allah above all else.
  • Lessons of Sacrifice: Eid-ul-Adha serves as a reminder of the profound lessons learned from Prophet Ibrahim's sacrifice. It encourages Muslims to embody the values of sacrifice in their daily lives, sacrificing their own desires, ego and material possessions for the sake of pleasing Allah and benefiting others.
  • Trust and Faith: Prophet Ibrahim's unwavering trust in Allah's plan and his willingness to offer his son as a sacrifice, display the depth of his faith. Eid-ul-Adha emphasises the significance of placing absolute trust in Allah's wisdom, even in situations that may seem challenging or incomprehensible.
  • Gratitude and Remembrance: The act of sacrifice on Eid-ul-Adha is a gesture of gratitude to Allah for His countless blessings and provisions. Muslims express their gratitude by sacrificing an animal and sharing the meat with family, friends and the less fortunate. This practice reminds them to appreciate the provisions they have received and to be mindful of the needs of others.
  • Selflessness and Generosity: The sacrifice on Eid-ul-Adha reflects the values of selflessness and generosity. Muslims are encouraged to share the meat from the sacrificed animal with those in need, fostering a sense of compassion, empathy and solidarity within the community. This act reminds individuals to prioritise the well-being and welfare of others, especially those who are less fortunate.
  • Atonement and Spiritual Cleansing: The act of sacrifice is also seen as a means of seeking forgiveness and spiritual purification. By sacrificing an animal, Muslims acknowledge their own shortcomings and sins, seeking Allah's forgiveness and striving for a renewed sense of purity and righteousness.
  • Unity and Brotherhood: Eid-ul-Adha promotes unity and brotherhood among Muslims. The act of sacrifice is performed collectively and the meat is shared with family, friends and the wider community. This practice strengthens bonds, encourages social cohesion and reminds individuals of their shared responsibilities towards one another.

In summary, the meaning and significance of sacrifice on Eid-ul-Adha encompass obedience to Allah, trust and faith, gratitude, selflessness, generosity, atonement, unity and the embodiment of important moral values. Through the act of sacrifice, Muslims seek to strengthen their relationship with Allah, demonstrate their devotion and foster a spirit of compassion and empathy towards all members of their community.

Catch every big hit, every wicket with Crickit, a one stop destination for Live Scores, Match Stats, Infographics & much more. Explore now!.

Catch your daily dose of Fashion, Taylor Swift, Health, Festivals, Travel, Relationship, Recipe and all the other Latest Lifestyle News on Hindustan Times Website and APPs.
SHARE THIS ARTICLE ON
SHARE
Story Saved
Live Score
OPEN APP
Saved Articles
Following
My Reads
Sign out
New Delhi 0C
Saturday, July 20, 2024
Start 14 Days Free Trial Subscribe Now
Follow Us On