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Home / Education / Mumbai University first merit list out: Self-financed degree courses top choice, check cutoff for prominent colleges

Mumbai University first merit list out: Self-financed degree courses top choice, check cutoff for prominent colleges

The University of Mumbai’s first merit list for undergraduate degree courses was released on Thursday, with many colleges seeing a spike in cut-offs for science, arts and commerce. Unaided self-financed courses remain a favourite of applicants.

education Updated: Aug 07, 2020 09:05 IST
Shreya Bhandary
Shreya Bhandary
Hindustan Times, Mumbai
St Xavier’s College
St Xavier’s College(Hindustan Times)

The University of Mumbai’s first merit list for undergraduate degree courses was released on Thursday, with many colleges seeing a spike in cut-offs for science, arts and commerce. Unaided self-financed courses remain a favourite of applicants.

Students allotted seats in the first merit list have from August 6 to August 11 to complete their admission process. To confirm admission, a candidate must submit all necessary documents online along with a copy of the pre-registration form to the college and their college fees. The second merit list will be released on August 11 at 7pm.

A mixed response for BA

This year, some of the top arts colleges retained high cut-offs. The cut-off for BA at St Xavier’s College is 92% for HSC students and 98.60% for other boards. Mithibai College closed its first list at 96%. Compared to 93% in 2019, this year the cut-off at KC College is 96% and Ramnarain Ruia College ended the first merit list on 95.6% compared to 95% last year.

At Wilson College, the cut-off is 93.6%, seven percentage points higher than 2019. “Cut-offs for almost all courses have gone up or remained similar to 2019. Despite Covid-19, students want to study in Mumbai. We got applications from many outstation students and the competition seems to be as fierce as 2019,” said Rajendra Shinde, principal, St Xavier’s College.

Surprisingly, DG Ruparel College saw a lower cut-off than last year. The BA cut-off at Ruparel College is 88.6% this year, compared to 2019’s 98%. “One reason is that we increased the intake for BA. We are also seeing a slight dip in the applications because of the Covid-19 situation as many students are in their hometown and unsure about moving back to Mumbai, at least for this academic year,” said Tushar Desai, principal, DG Ruparel College.

“One reason is that we have increased the intake for BA from this year so we are accommodating more students this year. We are also seeing a slight dip in number of applications, which could be because of the ongoing Covid-19 situation as many students are back in their hometown and unsure about moving back to Mumbai, at least for the current academic year,” said Tushar Desai, principal, DG Ruparel College.

Hindustantimes

Unaided courses attract top scorers:

Once again, unaided courses like bachelors in management studies (BMS), bachelors in accounting and finance (BAF), bachelors in banking and insurance (BBI), bachelors in mass media (BMM) as well as bachelors in financial markets (BFM) remain favourites among students.

Most top colleges recorded a slight rise in cut-offs for courses like BFM and BBI this year. “Unaided courses invariably attract more students because students still feel they have better job opportunities after such courses. Arts students, however, are moving more towards the traditional course over unaided courses,” said Hemlata Bagla, principal, KC College.

This year, the cut-off for BMS at Jai Hind College in Churchgate is 96.2% for commerce, slightly higher than last year’s 94.6%. For science stream, the BMS cut-off is 93.4%, compared to 89.8% last year. The cut-off for arts dipped by two percentage points.

Commerce and science attract more students

Traditional courses like bachelor of science (BSc) and bachelor of science in information technology (BSc-IT) or computer science (BSc-CS) have received more applications this year across several colleges.

“Overall, the university has received 25% more student registrations this year compared to last and this could be because of the uncertainty over admissions to professional courses. Many students must have blocked seats in traditional courses until they bag a seat in the course and institute of their choice. There’s a chance that more seats will go vacant once admissions to professional courses commence,” said Bagla.

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