Swinging ’60s in full flow at London’s Victoria & Albert Museum

Updated On Oct 25, 2016 07:28 PM IST
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In many domains -- including consumption, multiculturalism, civil rights, fashion, information and even politics -- the 1960s played an important role in shaping and defining today’s world. The London museum is paying homage to the 1960s with a major new exhibition -- You Say You Want a Revolution? Records and Rebels 1966-1970 -- taking its name from the famous Beatles song Revolution. Seen here, protests against the Vietnam War next to the Pentagon in 1967. (AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Oct 25, 2016 07:28 PM IST

In many domains -- including consumption, multiculturalism, civil rights, fashion, information and even politics -- the 1960s played an important role in shaping and defining today’s world. The London museum is paying homage to the 1960s with a major new exhibition -- You Say You Want a Revolution? Records and Rebels 1966-1970 -- taking its name from the famous Beatles song Revolution. Seen here, protests against the Vietnam War next to the Pentagon in 1967. (AFP)

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The era explored is from September 10, 2016 to February 26, 2017 when youth culture was the catalyst for an optimistic idealism, motivating people to come together and question established power structures. See here, American-born singer-songwriter and guitarist John Sebastian at Woodstock in 1969. (AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Oct 25, 2016 07:28 PM IST

The era explored is from September 10, 2016 to February 26, 2017 when youth culture was the catalyst for an optimistic idealism, motivating people to come together and question established power structures. See here, American-born singer-songwriter and guitarist John Sebastian at Woodstock in 1969. (AFP)

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The exhibition also looks at films of the day, such as the cult movie Blow Up (1966). (AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Oct 25, 2016 07:28 PM IST

The exhibition also looks at films of the day, such as the cult movie Blow Up (1966). (AFP)

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The exhibition features more than 350 items, encompassing photographs, posters, literature and, of course, music and design. Seen here, a post card of the 1967 World Fair in Montreal, Canada. (AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Oct 25, 2016 07:28 PM IST

The exhibition features more than 350 items, encompassing photographs, posters, literature and, of course, music and design. Seen here, a post card of the 1967 World Fair in Montreal, Canada. (AFP)

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Fashion had an important place in the era. The Souper Dress (1966) is an iconic piece from the late 1960s, bringing Andy Warhol’s famous Campbell’s soup can to a dress. (AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Oct 25, 2016 07:28 PM IST

Fashion had an important place in the era. The Souper Dress (1966) is an iconic piece from the late 1960s, bringing Andy Warhol’s famous Campbell’s soup can to a dress. (AFP)

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Design also features in the exhibition, including the Djinn Easy Chair by Olivier Mourgue. (AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Oct 25, 2016 07:28 PM IST

Design also features in the exhibition, including the Djinn Easy Chair by Olivier Mourgue. (AFP)

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Martin Roth, director of the V&A, says “This ambitious framing of late 1960s counterculture shows the incredible importance of that revolutionary period to our lives today. This seminal exhibition will shed new light on the wide-reaching social, cultural and intellectual changes of the late 1960s which followed the austerity of the post-war years, not just in the UK but throughout the Western world.” Seen here, an illustration for the Beatles single Revolution by Alan Aldridge. (AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Oct 25, 2016 07:28 PM IST

Martin Roth, director of the V&A, says “This ambitious framing of late 1960s counterculture shows the incredible importance of that revolutionary period to our lives today. This seminal exhibition will shed new light on the wide-reaching social, cultural and intellectual changes of the late 1960s which followed the austerity of the post-war years, not just in the UK but throughout the Western world.” Seen here, an illustration for the Beatles single Revolution by Alan Aldridge. (AFP)

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The exhibition focuses on particular environments that defined the cultural and social vanguard of the period, including Carnaby Street in London, clubs and counterculture, the Paris protests of May 1968, World Fairs including Montreal and Osaka, the Woodstock Festival of 1969 and alternative communities on the West Coast of America. Seen here, model and showgirl Christine Keeler by photographer Lewis Morley. (AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Oct 25, 2016 07:28 PM IST

The exhibition focuses on particular environments that defined the cultural and social vanguard of the period, including Carnaby Street in London, clubs and counterculture, the Paris protests of May 1968, World Fairs including Montreal and Osaka, the Woodstock Festival of 1969 and alternative communities on the West Coast of America. Seen here, model and showgirl Christine Keeler by photographer Lewis Morley. (AFP)

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