Photos: Assam floods inundate Kaziranga as Brahmaputra bursts

With over three-fourths of the Kaziranga National Park in Assam swamped by flood waters, park authorities have flown in drones to monitor the animals including the famed one-horned rhinos which have been forced to move to the highlands and the Karbi Anglong hills.

Updated On Jul 14, 2017 09:02 AM IST 10 Photos
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Rhinos with a calf seen at a highland during flood at Kaziranga National Park in Bagori range of Nagaon district. With over 75 per cent of the Kaziranga National Park in Assam submerged by flood waters, park authorities have flown in drones to ensure security of animals in the park, particularly the park’s famed one-horned rhinoceros. (PTI )

Rhinos with a calf seen at a highland during flood at Kaziranga National Park in Bagori range of Nagaon district. With over 75 per cent of the Kaziranga National Park in Assam submerged by flood waters, park authorities have flown in drones to ensure security of animals in the park, particularly the park’s famed one-horned rhinoceros. (PTI )

Updated on Jul 14, 2017 09:02 AM IST
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A herd of Indian hog deer swims through flood waters at Kaziranga National Park. (Biju BORO/ AFP)

A herd of Indian hog deer swims through flood waters at Kaziranga National Park. (Biju BORO/ AFP)

Updated on Jul 14, 2017 09:02 AM IST
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Centre for Wildlife Rehabilitation and Conservation (CWRC), the jointly run wildlife care facility of Assam Forest Department and International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) has rescued thirty one hog deer, out of which sixteen were released back to the wild, two seriously injured deer died the during treatment and eight are still under care at CWRC. (HT Photo)

Centre for Wildlife Rehabilitation and Conservation (CWRC), the jointly run wildlife care facility of Assam Forest Department and International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) has rescued thirty one hog deer, out of which sixteen were released back to the wild, two seriously injured deer died the during treatment and eight are still under care at CWRC. (HT Photo)

Updated on Jul 14, 2017 09:02 AM IST
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Indian forest officials leave for patrolling from their inundated watch tower in the flooded Kaziranga National Park. (Anupam Nath / AP)

Indian forest officials leave for patrolling from their inundated watch tower in the flooded Kaziranga National Park. (Anupam Nath / AP)

Updated on Jul 14, 2017 09:02 AM IST
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According to the Eastern Assam Wildlife Division, the animals, including rhinos, have been forced to take shelter at the highlands and at the Karbi Anglong hills across National Highway 37, which passes through the park. (PTI)

According to the Eastern Assam Wildlife Division, the animals, including rhinos, have been forced to take shelter at the highlands and at the Karbi Anglong hills across National Highway 37, which passes through the park. (PTI)

Updated on Jul 14, 2017 09:02 AM IST
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‘It is a routine migration process. There are some highlands inside the Kaziranga National Park where the animals take shelter during floods. However, some animals like the deer and elephants migrate to the higher grounds in Karbi Anglong during floods,’ park director Satyendra Prasad Singh told IANS. (PTI)

‘It is a routine migration process. There are some highlands inside the Kaziranga National Park where the animals take shelter during floods. However, some animals like the deer and elephants migrate to the higher grounds in Karbi Anglong during floods,’ park director Satyendra Prasad Singh told IANS. (PTI)

Updated on Jul 14, 2017 09:02 AM IST
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Indian forest guards seen out on patrol on a boat at Kaziranga National Park, about 250 kilometres east of Guwahati. (Biju BORO / AFP)

Indian forest guards seen out on patrol on a boat at Kaziranga National Park, about 250 kilometres east of Guwahati. (Biju BORO / AFP)

Updated on Jul 14, 2017 09:02 AM IST
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A forest guard patrols in a speed boat as the risk of poaching increases during floods. Animals such as rhinoceros, deer and buffalo move to higher ground to escape floods inundating the Indian preserve. Kaziranga National Park has the world's largest population of the one-horned rhinoceros and is home to many other wildlife. (Anupam Nath / AP)

A forest guard patrols in a speed boat as the risk of poaching increases during floods. Animals such as rhinoceros, deer and buffalo move to higher ground to escape floods inundating the Indian preserve. Kaziranga National Park has the world's largest population of the one-horned rhinoceros and is home to many other wildlife. (Anupam Nath / AP)

Updated on Jul 14, 2017 09:02 AM IST
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The annual floods assume significance for the ecology of the national park. Although it causes woes for the animals, the park needs to be flooded every year as floods wash away the unwanted weeds and it is very vital for the ecosystem of the park, say experts. (Biju BORO / AFP)

The annual floods assume significance for the ecology of the national park. Although it causes woes for the animals, the park needs to be flooded every year as floods wash away the unwanted weeds and it is very vital for the ecosystem of the park, say experts. (Biju BORO / AFP)

Updated on Jul 14, 2017 09:02 AM IST
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A boy rows a makeshift raft outside his submerged house in the flood-affected Kuthori village near Kaziranga National Park in Nagaon district, in the northeastern state of Assam, India. (Anuwar Hazarika / REUTERS)

A boy rows a makeshift raft outside his submerged house in the flood-affected Kuthori village near Kaziranga National Park in Nagaon district, in the northeastern state of Assam, India. (Anuwar Hazarika / REUTERS)

Updated on Jul 14, 2017 09:02 AM IST
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