Photos: Two years since JNU sedition case, campus still fumes over concerns

Two years since the anti-national chant controversy hit Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi, the campus has witnessed one row after another. From compulsory attendance limits to changes to the timings of its dhabas and grievances against the administration --some call it an attempt to change its character, while others see it as a positive transformation.

UPDATED ON FEB 09, 2018 01:45 PM IST 7 Photos
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Former JNUSU president Kanhaiya Kumar (C) protests at the JNU campus, New Delhi on February 11, 2016. Ever since the events of February 9, 2016, when some people allegedly raised anti-national slogans during a march to commemorate the hanging of parliament attack convict Afzal Guru, the university has been making headlines. Once known as country’s premier nursery, JNU has now become a centre of the Left versus Right debate with a row of issues dividing it campus. (Sanjeev Verma / HT Archive)

Former JNUSU president Kanhaiya Kumar (C) protests at the JNU campus, New Delhi on February 11, 2016. Ever since the events of February 9, 2016, when some people allegedly raised anti-national slogans during a march to commemorate the hanging of parliament attack convict Afzal Guru, the university has been making headlines. Once known as country’s premier nursery, JNU has now become a centre of the Left versus Right debate with a row of issues dividing it campus. (Sanjeev Verma / HT Archive)

UPDATED ON FEB 09, 2018 01:45 PM IST
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Protests, demonstrations, slogans and wall graffiti against administration have existed in JNU since its inception. The university recently made 75% attendance compulsory for all students, leading to students and teachers boycotting attendance sheets. Nivedita Menon, a professor, pointed out that students are attending the classes but refusing to sign the attendance sheet. “So we all go to the class but refuse to be controlled,” she said. (Vipin Kumar / HT Archive)

Protests, demonstrations, slogans and wall graffiti against administration have existed in JNU since its inception. The university recently made 75% attendance compulsory for all students, leading to students and teachers boycotting attendance sheets. Nivedita Menon, a professor, pointed out that students are attending the classes but refusing to sign the attendance sheet. “So we all go to the class but refuse to be controlled,” she said. (Vipin Kumar / HT Archive)

UPDATED ON FEB 09, 2018 01:45 PM IST
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Pappu Yadav addresses students during a protest against Kanhaiya’s arrest at JNU campus on February 29, 2016. The university also replaced its Gender Sensitization Committee Against Sexual Harassment (GSCASH) with an Internal Complaints Committee (ICC) after the executive council adopted the UGC (Prevention, Prohibition and Redressal of Sexual Harassment of Women Employees and Students in Higher Educational Institutions) Regulations 2015. (Sanjeev Verma / HT Archive)

Pappu Yadav addresses students during a protest against Kanhaiya’s arrest at JNU campus on February 29, 2016. The university also replaced its Gender Sensitization Committee Against Sexual Harassment (GSCASH) with an Internal Complaints Committee (ICC) after the executive council adopted the UGC (Prevention, Prohibition and Redressal of Sexual Harassment of Women Employees and Students in Higher Educational Institutions) Regulations 2015. (Sanjeev Verma / HT Archive)

UPDATED ON FEB 09, 2018 01:45 PM IST
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The last GSCASH formed in 2016 raised concerns over the influence the administration can have in cases against officials, as it nominates the majority of ICC members. “GSCASH had 22 members with a mix of elected and nominated members from students, teachers, wardens, staff and NGOs. But the ICC has six members nominated by the administration and in a way controlled by it,” said Moushumi Bose, a former GSCASH member. (Virendra Singh Gosain / HT Archive)

The last GSCASH formed in 2016 raised concerns over the influence the administration can have in cases against officials, as it nominates the majority of ICC members. “GSCASH had 22 members with a mix of elected and nominated members from students, teachers, wardens, staff and NGOs. But the ICC has six members nominated by the administration and in a way controlled by it,” said Moushumi Bose, a former GSCASH member. (Virendra Singh Gosain / HT Archive)

UPDATED ON FEB 09, 2018 01:45 PM IST
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The university ordered shutting all dhabas and tea stalls after 11 pm. Known for its 24X7 eateries and night-long debates and chats over tea and snacks the move was symptomatic of a cultural shift for some. JNU also released its admission prospectus with reduced number of seats in research courses which it said was as per a 2016 UGC notification that puts a cap on number of students a teacher can guide. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)

The university ordered shutting all dhabas and tea stalls after 11 pm. Known for its 24X7 eateries and night-long debates and chats over tea and snacks the move was symptomatic of a cultural shift for some. JNU also released its admission prospectus with reduced number of seats in research courses which it said was as per a 2016 UGC notification that puts a cap on number of students a teacher can guide. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)

UPDATED ON FEB 09, 2018 01:45 PM IST
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Only Ganga and Ram Singh dhabas were allowed to run till 2-3 am. The move to set up engineering and a management school, through IIT-JEE and GATE tests also kicked up a row. Some teachers said the test will deter students from weaker sections to join the university. Those who have welcomed these changes, describe opposition as knee-jerk reactions by Left-leaning students and teachers. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)

Only Ganga and Ram Singh dhabas were allowed to run till 2-3 am. The move to set up engineering and a management school, through IIT-JEE and GATE tests also kicked up a row. Some teachers said the test will deter students from weaker sections to join the university. Those who have welcomed these changes, describe opposition as knee-jerk reactions by Left-leaning students and teachers. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)

UPDATED ON FEB 09, 2018 01:45 PM IST
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The current students’ union alleges that vice chancellor Jagadesh Kumar refuses to meet students. “Earlier, V-Cs used to come down and talk to us if we sat on a hunger strike. This time we held a hunger strike for 18 days and yet the V-C did not meet us,” said Simone Zoya Khan, vice-president, JNUSU. Faculty members are also worried over the V-C’s decision to give himself the power to nominate experts to selection committees. (Virendra Singh Gosain / HT Archive)

The current students’ union alleges that vice chancellor Jagadesh Kumar refuses to meet students. “Earlier, V-Cs used to come down and talk to us if we sat on a hunger strike. This time we held a hunger strike for 18 days and yet the V-C did not meet us,” said Simone Zoya Khan, vice-president, JNUSU. Faculty members are also worried over the V-C’s decision to give himself the power to nominate experts to selection committees. (Virendra Singh Gosain / HT Archive)

UPDATED ON FEB 09, 2018 01:45 PM IST
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