Photos: Brazil slips into poverty as recession erodes a decade of progress

Between 2004 and 2014, tens of millions of Brazilians emerged from poverty and the country was often cited as an example for the world. But that trend has been reversed over the last two years due to the deepest recession in Brazil's history.

UPDATED ON OCT 24, 2017 12:38 PM IST 8 Photos
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‘Every day is a struggle to survive,’ 40-year-old Simone Batista said, recounting being cut from ‘Bolsa Familia’, a government subsidy program for low-income people in Brazil. Tens of millions of Brazilians emerged from poverty between 2004-14 as the country’s economy boomed, financing welfare programs that put money into the pockets of the poorest. But that trend has reversed over the last two years due to the deepest recession in Brazil’s history and cuts to its subsidy programs. (Silvia Izquierdo / AP)

‘Every day is a struggle to survive,’ 40-year-old Simone Batista said, recounting being cut from ‘Bolsa Familia’, a government subsidy program for low-income people in Brazil. Tens of millions of Brazilians emerged from poverty between 2004-14 as the country’s economy boomed, financing welfare programs that put money into the pockets of the poorest. But that trend has reversed over the last two years due to the deepest recession in Brazil’s history and cuts to its subsidy programs. (Silvia Izquierdo / AP)

UPDATED ON OCT 24, 2017 12:38 PM IST
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A man stands inside a building that used to house the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE), and is now occupied by hundreds of squatters in Rio de Janeiro’s Mangueira slum. Non-labor income, including social programs like Bolsa Familia, accounted for nearly 60 percent of the reduction in the number of people living in extreme poverty during the boom decade, said Emmanuel Skoufias, a World Bank economist. (Felipe Dana / AP)

A man stands inside a building that used to house the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE), and is now occupied by hundreds of squatters in Rio de Janeiro’s Mangueira slum. Non-labor income, including social programs like Bolsa Familia, accounted for nearly 60 percent of the reduction in the number of people living in extreme poverty during the boom decade, said Emmanuel Skoufias, a World Bank economist. (Felipe Dana / AP)

UPDATED ON OCT 24, 2017 12:38 PM IST
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Luciana Bastos (L) watches television inside the building that used to house the IBGE. Bastos, 30, recently moved here with her husband and two daughters after they both lost their jobs and couldn’t make the rent. In July, the last month for which data is available, unemployment was close to 13%, a huge increase from 4% at the end of 2004. (Felipe Dana / AP)

Luciana Bastos (L) watches television inside the building that used to house the IBGE. Bastos, 30, recently moved here with her husband and two daughters after they both lost their jobs and couldn’t make the rent. In July, the last month for which data is available, unemployment was close to 13%, a huge increase from 4% at the end of 2004. (Felipe Dana / AP)

UPDATED ON OCT 24, 2017 12:38 PM IST
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Children slide on a puddle near trash as they play in a squatted building. Hundreds of destitute residents living in the building find food by rummaging through garbage illegally dumped in the area. (Felipe Dana / AP)

Children slide on a puddle near trash as they play in a squatted building. Hundreds of destitute residents living in the building find food by rummaging through garbage illegally dumped in the area. (Felipe Dana / AP)

UPDATED ON OCT 24, 2017 12:38 PM IST
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Residents bathe in large garbage cans filled with water outside their squatter building and do their best to drown out the stench from mountains of trash and rummaging pigs in the centre of the building. (Felipe Dana / AP)

Residents bathe in large garbage cans filled with water outside their squatter building and do their best to drown out the stench from mountains of trash and rummaging pigs in the centre of the building. (Felipe Dana / AP)

UPDATED ON OCT 24, 2017 12:38 PM IST
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When Leticia Miranda had a job selling newspapers on the streets, she earned about $160 a month, just enough to pay for a tiny apartment she shared with her 8-year-old son. After losing her job about six months ago, she had no choice but to move the abandoned building where several hundreds were already living. Now, even as job losses have been pushing more people to programs like Bolsa Familia, fewer are being covered. (Felipe Dana / AP)

When Leticia Miranda had a job selling newspapers on the streets, she earned about $160 a month, just enough to pay for a tiny apartment she shared with her 8-year-old son. After losing her job about six months ago, she had no choice but to move the abandoned building where several hundreds were already living. Now, even as job losses have been pushing more people to programs like Bolsa Familia, fewer are being covered. (Felipe Dana / AP)

UPDATED ON OCT 24, 2017 12:38 PM IST
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Empty cooking pots and a baby bottle sit in Simone Batista’s outdoor kitchen where she lives with her 1-year-old son in Rio de Janeiro’s Jardim Gramacho slum. Batista said she was reduced to cooking over burning wood after her gas tank was stolen. (Silvia Izquierdo / AP)

Empty cooking pots and a baby bottle sit in Simone Batista’s outdoor kitchen where she lives with her 1-year-old son in Rio de Janeiro’s Jardim Gramacho slum. Batista said she was reduced to cooking over burning wood after her gas tank was stolen. (Silvia Izquierdo / AP)

UPDATED ON OCT 24, 2017 12:38 PM IST
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Children look out of an empty window of a building where hundreds of squatters live in the Mangueira slum in Rio de Janeiro. For many who live in Rio’s hundreds of favelas or slums, an already hardscrabble existence feels increasingly precarious. (Felipe Dana / AP)

Children look out of an empty window of a building where hundreds of squatters live in the Mangueira slum in Rio de Janeiro. For many who live in Rio’s hundreds of favelas or slums, an already hardscrabble existence feels increasingly precarious. (Felipe Dana / AP)

UPDATED ON OCT 24, 2017 12:38 PM IST
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