Photos: China passes contentious Hong Kong national security law

China passed a sweeping national security law for Hong Kong on June 30, in a move that comes with serious concerns over the territory’s autonomy. The legislation was unanimously approved by China's parliament and signed into effect by President Xi Jinping, according to the official Xinhua news agency, little more than six weeks after it was first unveiled. The contents of the law are not fully known, sparking even more concern and anger over what it holds in store.

UPDATED ON JUN 30, 2020 06:40 PM IST 7 Photos
1 / 7
Pro-China supporters display Chinese and Hong Kong flags near the government headquarters in Hong Kong on June 30. Chinese President Xi Jinping has signed an order approving a national security law that will allow authorities to crack down on subversive and secessionist activity in Hong Kong. (Anthony Wallace / AFP)

Pro-China supporters display Chinese and Hong Kong flags near the government headquarters in Hong Kong on June 30. Chinese President Xi Jinping has signed an order approving a national security law that will allow authorities to crack down on subversive and secessionist activity in Hong Kong. (Anthony Wallace / AFP)

UPDATED ON JUN 30, 2020 06:40 PM IST
2 / 7
Government supporters wave Chinese and Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) flags at Tamar Park to celebrate the passage of the national security law in Hong Kong on June 30. China’s top legislative body, the National People’s Congress Standing Committee, had earlier in the day unanimously approved the security law for Hong Kong at the end of a three-day meeting in Beijing. (Lam Yik / Bloomberg)

Government supporters wave Chinese and Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) flags at Tamar Park to celebrate the passage of the national security law in Hong Kong on June 30. China’s top legislative body, the National People’s Congress Standing Committee, had earlier in the day unanimously approved the security law for Hong Kong at the end of a three-day meeting in Beijing. (Lam Yik / Bloomberg)

UPDATED ON JUN 30, 2020 06:40 PM IST
3 / 7
Carrie Lam, Hong Kong's chief executive, is seen on the screens of smartphones live-streaming a news conference on June 30. Lam told the United Nations Human Rights Council in a video message that the law was urgently needed after the city was “traumatized by escalating violence fanned by external forces” during the unrest last year. Lam said the measure wouldn’t impact the city’s judicial independence. (Lam Yik / Bloomberg)

Carrie Lam, Hong Kong's chief executive, is seen on the screens of smartphones live-streaming a news conference on June 30. Lam told the United Nations Human Rights Council in a video message that the law was urgently needed after the city was “traumatized by escalating violence fanned by external forces” during the unrest last year. Lam said the measure wouldn’t impact the city’s judicial independence. (Lam Yik / Bloomberg)

UPDATED ON JUN 30, 2020 06:40 PM IST
4 / 7
Pro-China supporters raise a toast with champagne during a rally celebrating the law’s passing in Hong Kong on June 30. “We hope the law will serve as a deterrent to prevent people from stirring up trouble,” Tam Yiu-Chung, Hong Kong’s sole representative on the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress, was quoted by AP while addressing media. “Don’t let Hong Kong be used as a tool to split the country.” (Anthony Wallace / AFP)

Pro-China supporters raise a toast with champagne during a rally celebrating the law’s passing in Hong Kong on June 30. “We hope the law will serve as a deterrent to prevent people from stirring up trouble,” Tam Yiu-Chung, Hong Kong’s sole representative on the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress, was quoted by AP while addressing media. “Don’t let Hong Kong be used as a tool to split the country.” (Anthony Wallace / AFP)

UPDATED ON JUN 30, 2020 06:40 PM IST
5 / 7
A woman walks past a promotional banner for the national security law in Hong Kong on June 30. The law’s passage “represents the greatest threat to human rights in the city’s recent history,” the head of Amnesty International’s China Team, Joshua Rosenzweig told AP. Concerns have also been expressed by Taiwan, which Beijing also claims as its own territory. (Kin Cheung / AP)

A woman walks past a promotional banner for the national security law in Hong Kong on June 30. The law’s passage “represents the greatest threat to human rights in the city’s recent history,” the head of Amnesty International’s China Team, Joshua Rosenzweig told AP. Concerns have also been expressed by Taiwan, which Beijing also claims as its own territory. (Kin Cheung / AP)

UPDATED ON JUN 30, 2020 06:40 PM IST
6 / 7
Protesters gather at a shopping mall in Hong Kong’s Central district during a pro-democracy protest against Beijing's national security law on June 30. More than a hundred protesters gathered at the luxury mall, chanting slogans including “Free Hong Kong, Revolution Now,” with several holding up a flag representing an independent Hong Kong as well as posters condemning the law. (Vincent Yu / AP)

Protesters gather at a shopping mall in Hong Kong’s Central district during a pro-democracy protest against Beijing's national security law on June 30. More than a hundred protesters gathered at the luxury mall, chanting slogans including “Free Hong Kong, Revolution Now,” with several holding up a flag representing an independent Hong Kong as well as posters condemning the law. (Vincent Yu / AP)

UPDATED ON JUN 30, 2020 06:40 PM IST
7 / 7
A police officer (C, rear), confronts protesters to detain them at a shopping mall during a pro-democracy protest in Hong Kong on June 30. After the law passed, prominent Hong Kong pro-democracy activists Joshua Wong, Agnes Chow and Nathan Law issued statements on Facebook saying they would withdraw from the pro-democracy organization Demosisto. (Vincent Yu / AP)

A police officer (C, rear), confronts protesters to detain them at a shopping mall during a pro-democracy protest in Hong Kong on June 30. After the law passed, prominent Hong Kong pro-democracy activists Joshua Wong, Agnes Chow and Nathan Law issued statements on Facebook saying they would withdraw from the pro-democracy organization Demosisto. (Vincent Yu / AP)

UPDATED ON JUN 30, 2020 06:40 PM IST
SHARE
Story Saved