Photos: From Shanghai to Caracas, COVID-19 is moving life online

Millions of people worldwide are having to embrace life under lockdown - confined to their own four walls or neighbourhoods for weeks on end as countries battle to reduce the spread of the coronavirus. This new way of living poses huge challenges. Teaching, working and socialising have moved online as never before. The lockdown has also prompted some people to reassess their lives and what is most important to them, bringing unexpected realisations and touching moments with their families.

UPDATED ON MAR 24, 2020 02:38 PM IST 10 Photos
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Ana Pereira, 51, uses her computer to go online and join a virtual picnic with her friends at her home, during the novel coronavirus outbreak, in Caracas, Venuzuela. When asked what she missed most while self isolating she said, “I want a hug, because you can talk to people but the physical contact is what I miss most.” (Manaure Quintero / REUTERS)

Ana Pereira, 51, uses her computer to go online and join a virtual picnic with her friends at her home, during the novel coronavirus outbreak, in Caracas, Venuzuela. When asked what she missed most while self isolating she said, “I want a hug, because you can talk to people but the physical contact is what I miss most.” (Manaure Quintero / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON MAR 24, 2020 02:38 PM IST
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Dino Lin, Stella Zhang and Wowo Lin, 5, exercise using filled water bottles as weights as they watch a fitness class online at their house, during the outbreak, in Shanghai, China. “We have been staying at home mostly. We are not forced to do so but believe this is the best way to keep our family away from infection,” said Dino Lin. (Aly Song / REUTERS)

Dino Lin, Stella Zhang and Wowo Lin, 5, exercise using filled water bottles as weights as they watch a fitness class online at their house, during the outbreak, in Shanghai, China. “We have been staying at home mostly. We are not forced to do so but believe this is the best way to keep our family away from infection,” said Dino Lin. (Aly Song / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON MAR 24, 2020 02:38 PM IST
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Musicians from the Chinese group "The 2econd" Zhang Cheng, Zhuang Fei and Wen Zheng, perform for their fans during a live-streaming session broadcast on the video sharing website Bilibili at an office in Beijing, China, March 14, 2020. "I see this period as a double-edged sword. Although some performance plans have been postponed, it gave us more time to cool down and reflect on our work and to make it more mature," said Cheng. (Thomas Peter / REUTERS)

Musicians from the Chinese group "The 2econd" Zhang Cheng, Zhuang Fei and Wen Zheng, perform for their fans during a live-streaming session broadcast on the video sharing website Bilibili at an office in Beijing, China, March 14, 2020. "I see this period as a double-edged sword. Although some performance plans have been postponed, it gave us more time to cool down and reflect on our work and to make it more mature," said Cheng. (Thomas Peter / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON MAR 24, 2020 02:38 PM IST
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Marina Brebion, a French school teacher, helps her four children with school work,during an imposed lockdown to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Nantes, France. "We respect the lockdown instruction as much as possible," Brebion said. "For now, the confinement remains quite flexible, we can go out for the imperatives, like shopping." (REUTERS / Stephane Mahe)

Marina Brebion, a French school teacher, helps her four children with school work,during an imposed lockdown to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Nantes, France. "We respect the lockdown instruction as much as possible," Brebion said. "For now, the confinement remains quite flexible, we can go out for the imperatives, like shopping." (REUTERS / Stephane Mahe)

UPDATED ON MAR 24, 2020 02:38 PM IST
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DJs Eddy and Rhythmic perform a set during a live-streamed electronic music event at a closed nightclub, during the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Beijing, China, March 7, 2020. "The advantage is that there will be more people who get to know me through the internet, and to feel the different vibe that music could bring," said Eddy. (REUTERS / Carlos Garcia Rawlins )

DJs Eddy and Rhythmic perform a set during a live-streamed electronic music event at a closed nightclub, during the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Beijing, China, March 7, 2020. "The advantage is that there will be more people who get to know me through the internet, and to feel the different vibe that music could bring," said Eddy. (REUTERS / Carlos Garcia Rawlins )

UPDATED ON MAR 24, 2020 02:38 PM IST
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Dr. William Jason Sulaka, 40, a physician with Infinity Primary Care, looks at his computer as Dorene Blain, an Information Technology Support Analyst, leads a tutorial session on how to conduct virtual appointments through OTTO Health, a technology software which allows medical professionals to video chat with their patients, in West Bloomfield Township, Michigan. “I would rather see a patient in the office ... I prefer real visits to virtual visits,” Sulaka said. (REUTERS / Emily Elconin )

Dr. William Jason Sulaka, 40, a physician with Infinity Primary Care, looks at his computer as Dorene Blain, an Information Technology Support Analyst, leads a tutorial session on how to conduct virtual appointments through OTTO Health, a technology software which allows medical professionals to video chat with their patients, in West Bloomfield Township, Michigan. “I would rather see a patient in the office ... I prefer real visits to virtual visits,” Sulaka said. (REUTERS / Emily Elconin )

UPDATED ON MAR 24, 2020 02:38 PM IST
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Komaki Yamashita, 49, and her daughter Konoha, 9, receive an online dance lesson by Takujiro Hanayagi, a Japanese traditional dancer, during the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak at their home in Tokyo, Japan. Konoha is staying at home while her school is closed. Although the family sometimes go out to a park, they don't want to travel by public transport so are taking the dance classes online. (REUTERS / Issei Kato )

Komaki Yamashita, 49, and her daughter Konoha, 9, receive an online dance lesson by Takujiro Hanayagi, a Japanese traditional dancer, during the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak at their home in Tokyo, Japan. Konoha is staying at home while her school is closed. Although the family sometimes go out to a park, they don't want to travel by public transport so are taking the dance classes online. (REUTERS / Issei Kato )

UPDATED ON MAR 24, 2020 02:38 PM IST
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Jo Proudlove, 48, works online from a garden office in her home, whilst self-isolating with her daughter Eve, as the number of coronavirus cases increase around the world, in London, Britain. Following British government guidelines, the family believed and were also asked by Eve’s school that Eve should self-isolate for 14 days when the nine-year-old began to feel unwell and had a brief fever. (REUTERS / Toby Melville)

Jo Proudlove, 48, works online from a garden office in her home, whilst self-isolating with her daughter Eve, as the number of coronavirus cases increase around the world, in London, Britain. Following British government guidelines, the family believed and were also asked by Eve’s school that Eve should self-isolate for 14 days when the nine-year-old began to feel unwell and had a brief fever. (REUTERS / Toby Melville)

UPDATED ON MAR 24, 2020 02:38 PM IST
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Corrando Tomassini, 49, and his wife Rosanna Maserati, 49, work from home in Milan, following the Italian authorities decision to close schools and universities . “I had never experienced this kind of continuative smart working before. Even if my company launched the smart working programme several years ago, I never took advantage of it because I found it easier to go to the office, which is close to where I live.” said Tomassini. (REUTERS / Guglielmo Mangiapane)

Corrando Tomassini, 49, and his wife Rosanna Maserati, 49, work from home in Milan, following the Italian authorities decision to close schools and universities . “I had never experienced this kind of continuative smart working before. Even if my company launched the smart working programme several years ago, I never took advantage of it because I found it easier to go to the office, which is close to where I live.” said Tomassini. (REUTERS / Guglielmo Mangiapane)

UPDATED ON MAR 24, 2020 02:38 PM IST
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Kim Myung-hae, 46, a pre-school teacher, practices a dance by the South Korean boyband BTS as she watches a YouTube video at her home, during the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Gumi, Gyeongsang Province, South Korea. Kim has been self-isolating since the end of February. “Since I can’t go outside, I do a lot of online shopping. I surf the internet a lot too... I tend to watch a lot of YouTube,” Kim said. (REUTERS / Kim Kyung-Hoon )

Kim Myung-hae, 46, a pre-school teacher, practices a dance by the South Korean boyband BTS as she watches a YouTube video at her home, during the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Gumi, Gyeongsang Province, South Korea. Kim has been self-isolating since the end of February. “Since I can’t go outside, I do a lot of online shopping. I surf the internet a lot too... I tend to watch a lot of YouTube,” Kim said. (REUTERS / Kim Kyung-Hoon )

UPDATED ON MAR 24, 2020 02:38 PM IST
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