Stunning pictures of Jupiter sent by NASA’s Juno spacecraft

UPDATED ON APR 03, 2017 04:08 PM IST 10 Photos
1 / 10
NASA’s Juno spacecraft arrived at Jupiter in 2016 to study our solar system’s largest planet. (NASA)

NASA’s Juno spacecraft arrived at Jupiter in 2016 to study our solar system’s largest planet. (NASA)

UPDATED ON APR 03, 2017 04:08 PM IST
2 / 10
From a unique polar orbit, Juno repeatedly dives between the planet and its intense belts of charged particle radiation, coming only about 3,000 miles (5,000 kilometers) from the cloud tops at closest approach. (NASA)

From a unique polar orbit, Juno repeatedly dives between the planet and its intense belts of charged particle radiation, coming only about 3,000 miles (5,000 kilometers) from the cloud tops at closest approach. (NASA)

UPDATED ON APR 03, 2017 04:08 PM IST
3 / 10
Juno’s primary goal is to improve our understanding of Jupiter’s formation and evolution. (NASA)

Juno’s primary goal is to improve our understanding of Jupiter’s formation and evolution. (NASA)

UPDATED ON APR 03, 2017 04:08 PM IST
4 / 10
The spacecraft investigates the planet’s origins, interior structure, deep atmosphere and magnetosphere. (NASA)

The spacecraft investigates the planet’s origins, interior structure, deep atmosphere and magnetosphere. (NASA)

UPDATED ON APR 03, 2017 04:08 PM IST
5 / 10
Juno’s study of Jupiter will help us to understand the history of our own solar system and provide new insight into how planetary systems form and develop in our galaxy and beyond. (NASA)

Juno’s study of Jupiter will help us to understand the history of our own solar system and provide new insight into how planetary systems form and develop in our galaxy and beyond. (NASA)

UPDATED ON APR 03, 2017 04:08 PM IST
6 / 10
The Juno spacecraft, for the first time, sees below Jupiter’s dense cover of clouds. This is why the mission was named after the Roman goddess, who was Jupiter’s wife, and who could also see through clouds. (NASa)

The Juno spacecraft, for the first time, sees below Jupiter’s dense cover of clouds. This is why the mission was named after the Roman goddess, who was Jupiter’s wife, and who could also see through clouds. (NASa)

UPDATED ON APR 03, 2017 04:08 PM IST
7 / 10
The Juno mission investment is $1.13 billion in total. This cost includes spacecraft development, science instruments, launch services, mission operations, science data processing and relay support for 78 months. (NASA)

The Juno mission investment is $1.13 billion in total. This cost includes spacecraft development, science instruments, launch services, mission operations, science data processing and relay support for 78 months. (NASA)

UPDATED ON APR 03, 2017 04:08 PM IST
8 / 10
It is the first space mission to operate a solar powered spacecraft at Jupiter and the first space mission to orbit an outer planet from pole to pole. (NASa)

It is the first space mission to operate a solar powered spacecraft at Jupiter and the first space mission to orbit an outer planet from pole to pole. (NASa)

UPDATED ON APR 03, 2017 04:08 PM IST
9 / 10
It is also the first space mission to fly as close as 2,600 miles to Jupiter’s cloud tops and is designed to take the he highest resolution images of Jupiter in history. (NASa)

It is also the first space mission to fly as close as 2,600 miles to Jupiter’s cloud tops and is designed to take the he highest resolution images of Jupiter in history. (NASa)

UPDATED ON APR 03, 2017 04:08 PM IST
10 / 10
The Juno mission was the second spacecraft designed under NASA’s New Frontiers Program. The first was the Pluto New Horizons mission, launched in January 2006 and reached Pluto in the summer of 2015. The third mission will be the Origins-Spectral Interpretation-Resource Identification-Security Regolith Explorer, or OSIRIS-Rex — the first U.S. mission to carry materials from an asteroid back to Earth. (NASA)

The Juno mission was the second spacecraft designed under NASA’s New Frontiers Program. The first was the Pluto New Horizons mission, launched in January 2006 and reached Pluto in the summer of 2015. The third mission will be the Origins-Spectral Interpretation-Resource Identification-Security Regolith Explorer, or OSIRIS-Rex — the first U.S. mission to carry materials from an asteroid back to Earth. (NASA)

UPDATED ON APR 03, 2017 04:08 PM IST
SHARE
Story Saved