New Delhi -°C
Today in New Delhi, India

May 25, 2020-Monday
-°C

Humidity
-

Wind
-

Select city

Metro cities - Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai, Kolkata

Other cities - Noida, Gurgaon, Bengaluru, Hyderabad, Bhopal , Chandigarh , Dehradun, Indore, Jaipur, Lucknow, Patna, Ranchi

ADVERTISEMENT
Home / Science / Chase the lockdown blues away with skywatching, NASA shares tips

Chase the lockdown blues away with skywatching, NASA shares tips

You can watch Earth’s very own satellite Moon, of course, as well as some planets such as Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and distant stars such as Altair, Sirius, Orion and Fomahaut either in the hour before sunrise or in the early evening sky depending on where you are living and how clear the sky is.

science Updated: May 18, 2020 16:46 IST
hindustantimes.com | Edited by Anubha Rohatgi
hindustantimes.com | Edited by Anubha Rohatgi
New Delhi
The full moon, also known as the Supermoon or Flower Moon, rises during the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) above Vienna, Austria, May 7, 2020.
The full moon, also known as the Supermoon or Flower Moon, rises during the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) above Vienna, Austria, May 7, 2020. (Reuters File )

The coronavirus pandemic and the ensuing lockdowns all around the world has forced millions to stay at home. For many who do not have the option to work from home, looking for ways to keep oneself physically and mentally busy becomes a challenging task. One misses breathing in the fresh air, smelling the flowers or simply gazing at the stars!

But if you are among those lucky enough to have access to terrace or a roof, then NASA has the perfect quarantine activity for you to indulge in: skywatching.

 

You can watch Earth’s very own satellite Moon, of course, as well as some planets such as Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and distant stars such as Altair, Sirius, Orion and Fomahaut either in the hour before sunrise or in the early evening sky depending on where you are living and how clear the sky is.

The American space agency shared tips on skywatching on its website with a list of which planets and stars that can be seen in the month of May.

Several bright stars in the May early evening sky are a couple, to a few dozen, light years away, says NASA.
Several bright stars in the May early evening sky are a couple, to a few dozen, light years away, says NASA. ( Photo Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech )

Even though more than half the month is gone and you may have missed the chance to watch the final “supermoon” of 2020 on May 7, there is still a fortnight left during which one may be able to see “the thin waxing crescent Moon below the planets Venus and Mercury” on May 23 evening and “the bright star Regulus that will appear to the left of the waxing crescent Moon” on May 28 evening into early morning of May 29, according to NASA.

Even if one is not able to identify the planets and stars, just gazing into the star-lit night sky or the early morning sky bathed in the red of the dawn would be enough to chase the lockdown blues away!

ht epaper

Sign In to continue reading