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brain

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Study uncovers blood vessel damage, inflammation in Covid-19 patients’ brains

In an in-depth study of how Covid-19 affects a patient’s brain, National Institutes of Health researchers consistently spotted hallmarks of damage caused by thinning and leaky brain blood vessels in tissue samples from patients who died shortly after contracting the disease.
In an in-depth study of how Covid-19 affects a patient’s brain, National Institutes of Health researchers consistently spotted hallmarks of damage caused by thinning and leaky brain blood vessels in tissue samples from patients who died shortly after contracting the disease.(Yahoo)
In an in-depth study of how Covid-19 affects a patient’s brain, National Institutes of Health researchers consistently spotted hallmarks of damage caused by thinning and leaky brain blood vessels in tissue samples from patients who died shortly after contracting the disease.(Yahoo)
Updated on Dec 31, 2020 02:04 PM IST
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Washington | By Asian News International | Posted by Shivani Kale

Research reveals how brain distinguishes speech from noise

During a recent study, researchers provided the first physiological evidence that a foundational centre of the brain influences how sound is processed by identifying a previously unknown neural circuit.
Researchers have provided the first physiological evidence that a foundational centre of the brain influences how sound is processed by identifying a previously unknown neural circuit.(Unsplash)
Researchers have provided the first physiological evidence that a foundational centre of the brain influences how sound is processed by identifying a previously unknown neural circuit.(Unsplash)
Published on Dec 21, 2020 01:14 PM IST
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Washington | By Asian News International | Posted by Shivani Kale

New means of neuronal communication discovered in human brain

An international research group has discovered in the human brain a new functional coupling mechanism between neurons, which may serve as a communication channel between brain regions.
An international research group has discovered in the human brain a new functional coupling mechanism between neurons, which may serve as a communication channel between brain regions.(Unsplash)
An international research group has discovered in the human brain a new functional coupling mechanism between neurons, which may serve as a communication channel between brain regions.(Unsplash)
Published on Dec 19, 2020 06:27 PM IST
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Helsinki | By Asian News International | Posted by Shivani Kale

Team co-led by Indian scientists discovers how malaria affects brain

According to the researchers, cerebral malaria is a severe, life-threatening complication of infection with the Plasmodium falciparum parasite that can infect humans through the bite of Anopheles mosquitoes.
The study, published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases on Wednesday, used cutting-edge MRI scans to compare the changes in the brains of survivors with those who died from the disease across different age-groups.(AP (Representative Image))
The study, published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases on Wednesday, used cutting-edge MRI scans to compare the changes in the brains of survivors with those who died from the disease across different age-groups.(AP (Representative Image))
Published on Dec 16, 2020 05:57 PM IST
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New Delhi | By Press Trust of India | Posted by Nilavro Ghosh

Scientists show what loneliness looks inside the brain

Scientists have evidenced several differences in the brains of lonely people.
(Pixabay)
(Pixabay)
Published on Dec 15, 2020 06:54 PM IST
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Asian News International | By Asian News International | Posted by Shivani Kale, Washington

Researchers reveal how human brains know when something’s different

In a study involving epilepsy patients, National Institutes of Health has discovered how a set of high-frequency brain waves may help us spot these kinds of differences between the past and the present.
“Our results suggest that every experience we store into memory can be used to set our expectations and predictions for the future,” Kareem Zaghloul.(Pixabay)
“Our results suggest that every experience we store into memory can be used to set our expectations and predictions for the future,” Kareem Zaghloul.(Pixabay)
Updated on Dec 15, 2020 12:30 PM IST
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Washington [US] | By Asian News International | Posted by Jahnavi Gupta

Here’s how brain implants might soon help restore rudimentary vision for blind people

Restoring vision for visually impaired people might soon be a reality with the help of brain implants, due to recent discoveries at the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN), which were published in the journal Science.
Representational image(Unsplash)
Representational image(Unsplash)
Published on Dec 07, 2020 02:28 PM IST
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Amsterdam, Netherlands | By Asian News International | Posted by: Alfea Jamal

Novel study suggests free radicals most likely important for brain. Here’s how

A recent research suggests that the free radicals are not fundamentally bad for the brain, in fact, they are most likely important for the brain to remain adaptable throughout life and to age in a healthy way -- at least in mice.
Representational Image(Unsplash)
Representational Image(Unsplash)
Updated on Dec 07, 2020 02:25 PM IST
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Washington DC | By Asian News International | Posted by: Alfea Jamal

Serotonin promotes patience in parts of brain. Here’s how

Serotonin, the hormone which determines the level of patience, has been found by a study done on mice to also dictate whether one will crave instant gratification or will calmly anticipate the reward.
Representational image(UNSPLASH)
Representational image(UNSPLASH)
Updated on Nov 30, 2020 02:04 PM IST
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Okinawa, Japan | By Asian News International | Posted by: Alfea Jamal

Scientists reveal regions of the brain where serotonin promotes patience

In a study on mice, scientists pinpoint specific areas of the brain that individually promote patience through the action of serotonin.
Learning to suppress the impulse for instant gratification is often vital for future success, but how patience is regulated in the brain remains poorly understood.(Pixabay)
Learning to suppress the impulse for instant gratification is often vital for future success, but how patience is regulated in the brain remains poorly understood.(Pixabay)
Updated on Nov 28, 2020 12:40 PM IST
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Okinawa [Japan] | By Asian News International | Posted by Jahnavi Gupta

Your favourite music can send your brain into pleasure overload: Study

Neuroscientists based in France have now used electroencephalogram (EEG) to link chills to multiple brain regions involved in activating reward and pleasure systems.
About half of people get chills when listening to music.(Unplash)
About half of people get chills when listening to music.(Unplash)
Updated on Nov 10, 2020 10:34 AM IST
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Washington [US] | By Asian News International | Posted by Jahnavi Gupta

Children with asymptomatic brain bleeds as newborns show normal brain development at age two

UNC researchers published unexpected and surprising results from a study based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of newborn brains.
Representational image(Unsplash)
Representational image(Unsplash)
Updated on Oct 31, 2020 07:02 PM IST
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Washington US | By Asian News International | Posted by: Alfea Jamal

Researchers suggest fear and anxiety share same bases in brain

A recent study suggests that fear and anxiety reflect overlapping set of neural building blocks in the brain.
“The conceptual distinction between ‘fear’ and ‘anxiety’ dates back to the time of Freud, if not the Greek philosophers of antiquity.”(Unsplash)
“The conceptual distinction between ‘fear’ and ‘anxiety’ dates back to the time of Freud, if not the Greek philosophers of antiquity.”(Unsplash)
Updated on Oct 20, 2020 11:59 PM IST
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Washington [US] | By Asian News International | Posted by Jahnavi Gupta

How the brain helps us navigate social differences, study shows

A new research has revealed that a person’s brain reflexes differently when talking to a person from a different socio-economic background from their own.
In the study, published in the journal Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 39 pairs of participants had a conversation with each other while wearing headsets that tracked brain activity.(Unsplash)
In the study, published in the journal Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 39 pairs of participants had a conversation with each other while wearing headsets that tracked brain activity.(Unsplash)
Updated on Oct 10, 2020 05:47 PM IST
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Washington [US] | By Asian News International | Posted by Jahnavi Gupta

Study finds how brain helps us navigate social differences

Our brain responds differently if we talk to a person of a different socioeconomic background from our own compared to when we speak to someone whose background is similar.
The findings support previous research suggesting that frontal lobe systems play a role in detecting bias and helping us to regulate our behaviour to avoid bias expression.(Pixabay)
The findings support previous research suggesting that frontal lobe systems play a role in detecting bias and helping us to regulate our behaviour to avoid bias expression.(Pixabay)
Updated on Oct 05, 2020 01:05 PM IST
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Washington [US] | By Asian News International | Posted by Jahnavi Gupta

World Alzheimer’s Day 2020: Let’s talk about Dementia, here’s how to challenge the stigma around it

World Alzheimer’s Day 2020: Know all about Dementia, history and significance of the theme this year and how you can provide support. Since there is little or no understanding of the disease, the stigmatisation and misinformation about it is a global problem
World Alzheimer’s Day 2020: Let’s break the silence around Dementia(Twitter/AlzDisInt)
World Alzheimer’s Day 2020: Let’s break the silence around Dementia(Twitter/AlzDisInt)
Updated on Sep 21, 2020 11:01 AM IST
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Hindustan Times, Delhi | By Zarafshan Shiraz

‘Superpower’:Unlike adults, children use both brain hemispheres to understand language and recover from neural energy much easier

To understand language (more specifically, processing spoken sentences), children use both the brain’s hemispheres, right and left -- quite different from what adults do.
Representational Image(Unsplash)
Representational Image(Unsplash)
Published on Sep 08, 2020 08:57 PM IST
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Washington DC | By Asian News International | Posted by: Alfea Jamal

Sleep pattern linked to Alzheimer’s disease, Neuroscientists estimate when and how it will develop

Recent researches show that your current sleeping pattern can estimate when and how Alzheimer’s disease will develop in your brain
Your current sleep pattern can estimate Alzheimer’s disease(Twitter/firefighters999)
Your current sleep pattern can estimate Alzheimer’s disease(Twitter/firefighters999)
Updated on Sep 04, 2020 03:00 PM IST
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Washington [US] | By Asian News International | Posted by Zarafshan Shiraz

Brain estrogen levels key to protect brain in stroke-like conditions: Study

Estrogen made by neurons is protective in ischemia is by suppressing signalling of the fibroblast growth factor, FGF2, which is also made by neurons and known to suppress astrocyte activation.
To try to understand how astrocytes take on this enhanced role, they knocked out the enzyme aromatase, which is critical to estrogen production, in neurons in the forebrain. (Representational Image)(Unsplash)
To try to understand how astrocytes take on this enhanced role, they knocked out the enzyme aromatase, which is critical to estrogen production, in neurons in the forebrain. (Representational Image)(Unsplash)
Updated on Sep 03, 2020 09:11 AM IST
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Augusta [Georgia] | By Asian News International | Posted by Saumya Sharma

Physical stress on the job linked with faster brain, memory decline in older age

A new study has found that physical stress in one’s job may be associated with faster brain ageing and poorer memory.
Representational image(Unsplash)
Representational image(Unsplash)
Updated on Jul 24, 2020 06:17 PM IST
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Colorado | By Asian News International | Posted by: Alfea Jamal

Here’s why your brain forgets things it deems boring, routine

It is very common to often forget daily routines such as taking your daily medications or responding to that one email which you have been meaning to send. In a new study, researchers now found the reason for this forgetfulness
Representational Image(Unsplash)
Representational Image(Unsplash)
Updated on Jul 20, 2020 06:15 PM IST
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Illinois | By Asian News International | Posted by: Alfea Jamal

Loneliness alters brain’s social network, here’s how

People who struggle with loneliness often perceive a gap between themselves and others. This gap is reflected in the activity patterns of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC).
Lonelier people have a “lonelier” neural representation of their relationships. (Representational Image)(Unsplash)
Lonelier people have a “lonelier” neural representation of their relationships. (Representational Image)(Unsplash)
Updated on Jul 19, 2020 01:17 PM IST
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Washington D.C. [USA] | By Asian News International | Posted by Saumya Sharma

Here’s why artificial brains may need sleep for proper functioning

The discovery came about as the research team worked to develop neural networks that closely approximate how humans and other biological systems learn to see.
Representational Image.(UNSPLASH)
Representational Image.(UNSPLASH)
Updated on Jun 14, 2020 03:27 PM IST
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Washington DC | By Asian News International | Posted by: Alfea Jamal

‘I would want to finish match quickly but...’- Hussey on Dhoni’s ‘calculative’ brain

Speaking on an Instagram Live video on CSK’s official handle, Hueey said: “Of course he is still fit to play international cricket. But Dhoni is the best person to answer what is in his mind.”
Former Chennai Super Kings captain MS Dhoni with Michael Hussey.(IPL)
Former Chennai Super Kings captain MS Dhoni with Michael Hussey.(IPL)
Updated on Apr 23, 2020 06:16 PM IST
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Hindustan Times, New Delhi | By HT Correspondent

Confusion, seizure, strokes: How COVID-19 may affect the brain and nervous system

A pattern is emerging among COVID-19 patients arriving at hospitals in New York: Beyond fever, cough and shortness of breath, some are deeply disoriented to the point of not knowing where they are or what year it is.
A woman wearing a protective face mask prays during a service at the cathedral on the eve of the Orthodox Easter, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Stavropol, Russia April 18, 2020. REUTERS/Eduard Korniyenko(REUTERS)
A woman wearing a protective face mask prays during a service at the cathedral on the eve of the Orthodox Easter, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Stavropol, Russia April 18, 2020. REUTERS/Eduard Korniyenko(REUTERS)
Updated on Apr 18, 2020 07:15 PM IST
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Washington DC | By Agence France-Presse

Here’s how following a Mediterranean diet sharpens your brain

The mediterranean diet which is high in vegetables, whole grains, fish, and olive oil not only helps you live longer but also keeps the brain sharper, say researchers, adding that those who followed the diet had the lowest risk of cognitive impairment.
The mediterranean diet which is high in vegetables, whole grains, fish, and olive oil not only helps you live longer but also keeps the brain sharper, say researchers, adding that those who followed the diet had the lowest risk of cognitive impairment.(UNSPLASH)
The mediterranean diet which is high in vegetables, whole grains, fish, and olive oil not only helps you live longer but also keeps the brain sharper, say researchers, adding that those who followed the diet had the lowest risk of cognitive impairment.(UNSPLASH)
Updated on Apr 14, 2020 05:55 PM IST
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New York | By Indo Asian News Service

Creativity is born from the right part of the brain. Here’s all you need to know

Creativity is driven primarily by the right hemisphere in musicians who are comparatively inexperienced at improvisation.
Creativity is driven primarily by the right hemisphere in musicians who are comparatively inexperienced at improvisation.(Unsplash)
Creativity is driven primarily by the right hemisphere in musicians who are comparatively inexperienced at improvisation.(Unsplash)
Updated on Apr 07, 2020 01:58 PM IST
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Washington D.C. [USA] | By Asian News International

Health issues during 20s likely to develop weaker brain. Here’s why

Health issues such as smoking, high cholesterol or a high body mass index (BMI) in your youth, may make you more likely to have a weak brain in your older age.
Health issues such as smoking, high cholesterol or a high body mass index (BMI) in your youth, may make you more likely to have a weak brain in your older age.(UNSPLASH)
Health issues such as smoking, high cholesterol or a high body mass index (BMI) in your youth, may make you more likely to have a weak brain in your older age.(UNSPLASH)
Updated on Feb 27, 2020 02:57 PM IST
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Washington DC | By Asian News International

27-year-old brain dead Sangrur man gives new lease of life to four

He was admitted with fatal head injuries at a civil hospital in Kharar on February 9 and was referred to Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research on February 10
Published on Feb 18, 2020 01:09 AM IST
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Hindustan Times, Chandigarh | By HT Correspondent, Chandigarh

Here’s why traffic-related air pollution can lead to affecting brain’s structural development

Grey matter includes regions of the brain involved in motor control as well as sensory perception, such as seeing and hearing. Cortical thickness reflects the outer grey matter depth.
Traffic-related air pollution can lead to affecting brain’s structural development.(Pixabay)
Traffic-related air pollution can lead to affecting brain’s structural development.(Pixabay)
Updated on Feb 03, 2020 12:39 PM IST
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Washington D.C. [USA] | By Asian News International
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Saturday, October 16, 2021