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Home / Cricket / Tamil Nadu, Haryana resist BCCI reforms

Tamil Nadu, Haryana resist BCCI reforms

The Amicus Curiae PS Narasimha, and the Committee of Administrators, along with BCCI officials, have been locked in meetings over the past few days with state bodies to resolve differences.

cricket Updated: May 03, 2019, 02:45 IST
Khurram Habib
Khurram Habib
Hindustan Times, New Delhi
A view of logo of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI).
A view of logo of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI).(Hindustan Times via Getty Images)

Tamil Nadu and Haryana are the only two major states that have not yet reached consensus with the CoA and have not been deemed as states conforming to the new BCCI constitution or even coming close to it. The two states have been mainly demanding concession on disqualified members’ right to be in state committees.

The Amicus Curiae PS Narasimha, and the Committee of Administrators, along with BCCI officials, have been locked in meetings over the past few days with state bodies to resolve differences. The Amicus has spent close to 150 hours in discussions and seems to have managed to get CoA and most state bodies on common ground, while allowing certain concessions. This should allow decks to be cleared for BCCI and state bodies’ elections soon.

A top state body official privy to the matters said, “Altogether around 29 state bodies (out of 38) have resolved matters, with some like Chhattisgarh and Madhya Pradesh saying they just need to place it in front of their general body, a mere formality. It is just Tamil Nadu and Haryana, and a couple other smaller states, who are acting tough, especially on disqualified members not being allowed place in the committees or being able to represent the states. The Supreme Court is very clear on this matter. It doesn’t want them to return to the fold.”

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Disqualified members are those that have already completed 18 years (nine at BCCI and nine at state) as office-bearer, or are 70 years old. There have been six or seven senior members from who are keen to be part of committees and want to represent the state bodies in meetings.

The CoA’s stance is that the Supreme Court has made it clear that disqualified members can’t be part of committees either.

It has also been learnt that most states have agreed on giving voting rights to players who represent India, though there has been opposition to giving it to first-class players.

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