Congress spokesperson Abhishek Manu Singhvi was part f the delegation tat held a virtual meeting with the NBSA chairperson.(ANI File Photo)
Congress spokesperson Abhishek Manu Singhvi was part f the delegation tat held a virtual meeting with the NBSA chairperson.(ANI File Photo)

Congress urges NBSA to regulate TV debates

The request comes in the wake of the death of Congress leader Rajiv Tyagi, who suffered a heart attack hours after participating in a TV debate on August 12
Hindustan Times, New Delhi | By HT Correspondent
UPDATED ON AUG 20, 2020 03:01 AM IST

A Congress delegation on Wednesday urged the News Broadcasting Standards Authority (NBSA) to strictly enforce a code of conduct to curb the “sensationalist, slanderous and toxic nature” of televised debates and ensure that they do not become a platform to spread acrimony.

The delegation, comprising spokespersons Abhishek Manu Singhvi and Jaiveer Shergill, and party secretary Pranav Jha, held a virtual meeting with NBSA chairperson Justice (retd) AK Sikri and other members, and urged them to issue an advisory to all the mOn behalf of the Congress delegation, Singhvi argued that media houses, journalists, anchors and spokespersons must be held accountable for their actions and conduct. edia houses in this regard. The meeting followed a representation filed by Shergill on August 14 in the wake of the death of his party colleague Rajiv Tyagi, who suffered a heart attack hours after participating in a TV debate on August 12.

On behalf of the Congress delegation, Singhvi argued that media houses, journalists, anchors and spokespersons must be held accountable for their actions and conduct.

The News Broadcasters Association (NBA) holds the authority to ensure compliance with its guidelines and instructions, he said.

“The TRP paradigm drives the sensational, slanderous and sardonic debate panels. There is an eminent need for adherence to the code of conduct and need for institutional reform in India with respect to holding of TV debates,” Singhvi said.

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