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Tuesday, Oct 15, 2019

Society can’t run on Constitution alone, says RSS’ Suresh Bhaiyyaji Joshi

The Sangh functionary said his organisation sees a pattern of a “conspiracy against Hindu culture” in cases seeking bans on firecrackers during Diwali and the bull taming festival of Jallikattu.

india Updated: Mar 11, 2019 05:59 IST
Smriti Kak Ramachandran
Smriti Kak Ramachandran
Hindustan Times, Gwalior
The society does not run on the basis of what’s laid down in the Constitution alone as traditions and faith have their own place, Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) general secretary Suresh Bhaiyyaji Joshi said on Sunday
The society does not run on the basis of what’s laid down in the Constitution alone as traditions and faith have their own place, Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) general secretary Suresh Bhaiyyaji Joshi said on Sunday(HT File Photo)
         

The society does not run on the basis of what’s laid down in the Constitution alone as traditions and faith have their own place, Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) general secretary Suresh Bhaiyyaji Joshi said on Sunday, speaking on a few court rulings in cases related to the Hindu faith.

On the last day of the Akhil Bharatiya Pratinidhi Sabha in Madhya Pradesh’s Gwalior, Joshi said the Sangh has passed a resolution on the need to protect the traditions and beliefs of Hindu society.

“I agree that Constitution has its own power and capability, but society does not run only on the basis of the Constitution alone,” he said.

The Sangh functionary said his organisation sees a pattern of a “conspiracy against Hindu culture” in cases seeking bans on firecrackers during Diwali and the bull taming festival of Jallikattu.

The Sangh has also taken exception to the top court’s decision that scrapped a centuries-old tradition and allowed women of all ages to enter Kerala’s Sabarimala temple.

“We have said it in the resolution that those who are not Hindu and not Indian are raising sensitive issues and questions recurrently; they are attacking the faith of the Hindus and this is a conspiracy,” he added, responding to a question on why the Sangh has been critical of the Supreme Court in its annual report for decisions on Sabarimala and for the delay in the Ayodhya case.

“We think that society works on the basis of Constitution as well as on the basis of traditions and faith; and there are many issues on which those having expertise in social, spiritual and religious areas should also weigh in and show the way, and not just the judiciary [should decide],” Joshi said.

Joshi also said the government should keep its view on Section 35A firmly in court so that a discussion can be taken up on Article 370 after a verdict on the former.

Article 35A of the Constitution accords special rights and privileges to the citizens of Jammu and Kashmir and bars people from outside the state from acquiring any immovable property in the state.

It also empowers the Jammu and Kashmir assembly to define “permanent residents” to bestow special rights and privileges on them.

The Supreme Court is scheduled to hear a batch of pleas challenging the constitutional validity of Article 35A.

Article 370 of the Constitution grants special status to Jammu and Kashmir and limits Parliament’s power to make laws concerning the state.

First Published: Mar 11, 2019 05:59 IST

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