City students make navigation system for blind | india | Hindustan Times
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City students make navigation system for blind

DIVYA DRISHTI, remember the name. It may turn out to be the most revolutionary step in the advancement of the visually challenged since Louis Braille?s embossed dots on thick paper in 1829.

india Updated: Jan 31, 2006 12:42 IST

DIVYA DRISHTI, remember the name. It may turn out to be the most revolutionary step in the advancement of the visually challenged since Louis Braille’s embossed dots on thick paper in 1829.

Divya Drishti, or divine sight, is a high-tech, infrared-based system that helps the blind in spatially orienting themselves, thereby facilitating navigation within closed environs like offices, railway stations and even malls.

Most importantly, it is inexpensive. Readying an area the size of, say, Indore railway platform number one for the indoor navigation system would cost only around Rs 15,000. While cost of receiver units to be worn by visually handicapped would hover in the region of Rs 350-500.

Developed by Pallavi Tiwari and Dhruv Sakalley, final year biomedical engineering students at SGSITS, the system bagged the second prize in the rehabilitation engineering section at Techfest, IIT Powai in 2006.

“We are currently in the process of applying for a patent for the navigation system”, informs Professor Shafi Patel, Director, Techoz Solutions, the firm that provided the necessary technical guidance and fiscal assistance to Pallavai and Dhruv to bring their concept to fruition.

“Once that is through we will look for partners to finance mass production of the device”, he added. Although mass production is some way off, the navigating system holds immense possibilities and could well be the great leveller; granting visually handicapped persons a degree of ambulatory independence so far enjoyed only by normal sighted people.