HT Image
HT Image

Human dignity lowest in India, says expert

JASMIN JOSEPH of National University of Juridical Science (Kolkata) today said that India was trying to project itself as a state looking forward to claim a place in the league of developed nations.
None | By HT Correspondent, Varanasi
PUBLISHED ON JUL 29, 2006 12:06 AM IST

JASMIN JOSEPH of National University of Juridical Science (Kolkata) today said that India was trying to project itself as a state looking forward to claim a place in the league of developed nations.

“Towards this end, India has to a considerable extent substantiate its position politically, as a regional player in Asia”, said Jodeph while delivering a talk on ‘Practical Issues of Human Rights: South Indian Context’ at Malviya Centre for Peace Research in Banaras Hindu University here on Thursday evening.

“It has also placed its claim for permanent membership in the Security Council in the United Nations. To substantiate its claim as a rapidly developed country, India highlights several statistical data like the annual growth rate in which it is second only to China in the region”, she added.

“However, if human dignity is to be considered as indicator of development, India probably finds itself placed as one of the worst among the world nations.

Human dignity is the quintessence of human rights. However, the quotient of dignity for an average Indian is considered to be very low in comparison with various other developing nations”, she said.

“Though promises are intact on paper concerning enunciation and protection of Human Rights, there are wide gaps in these promises being fulfilled. The implementation machinery is not only inefficient but also regressive when it comes to the fulfillment of its policies. In fact the law enforcement agencies of the State is corrupt from top to bottom. The State as a collective of various communities remains indifferent to the practice of discrimination based on birth and gender”, she lamented.

Bijo Francis of South Asian Desk Officer of Asian Human Rights Commission, said that the perceived difference between the theory and practice of Human Rights had always been thought to be a divide between the academics and activists.

Bringing examples of violation of Human Rights from the real world in Sri Lanka, Nepal and Pakistan, Francis drew the attention of the audience to the gaps in not only the implementation of the human rights regime but also the spaces that exist for the voluntary world to make a difference.

Dean of Social Science Faculty, Prof. PN Pandey, presided over the talk whereas coordinator of Centre, Prof Priyanker Upadhyay, introduced the significance of the subject.

The talk was followed by a discussion in which several academicians and
activists took part.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE ON
Close
SHARE
Story Saved
OPEN APP